Tag Archives: aliens

Let Them Come review

There’s a scene in Aliens where the marines setup automatic turrets to shoot the approaching horde of aliens. In Let Them Come you essentially recreate that scene but as a gunner controlling a turret. It’s intense, a little scare despite the pixel art aesthetic, fun and challenging. It’s so very similar to that scene from Aliens, yet to my knowledge, this is the first time it’s been translated to a tower defence game, and it works marvellously.

It’s so very simple. A text introduction paints the picture of a lone soldier needing to setup his turret at different locations to figure out the story behind this alien infestation. It’s then a matter of you earning credits by shooting the aliens, buying upgrades for your character and the turret, then conquering multiple waves of aliens, defeating a boss, and moving on to the next location.

Pixel art conveys the action and gore. The narrow corridors with subtle animations in the background, foreground and the sides bringing each scene to life. Silky smooth animations for your character’s movement as well as that of the many different alien species. It looks fantastic. In fact this art style is miraculous, and not just here but practically everywhere I see it. How these pixel artists capture a person, an alien, a location so beautifully and in such detail while shaping it in pixels is miraculous. Here it also works to add a level of nostalgia to the title, to manage your expectations for a simple game of tower defence. Indeed, it wouldn’t have been out of place as an official Aliens game from 1986, if it wasn’t for the exceptionally smooth frame rate, crisp well-defined pixels and copious amounts of alien hostiles and bullets filling the corridor that only modern system can truly handle at this level of quality.

There’s more to it than simply letting loose with your turret against the waves of aliens, though, and soon you’re contemplating precisely what you need to purchase between waves to best fight the horde; what the best tools are for this violent but necessary job of survival. You can only hold limited ammo types and equipment, and choosing the right combination becomes more and more critical as the waves progress.

Four slots can be filled with passive upgrades, these being buffs to health, or armour against projectiles, cooling vents for the turret, and several more which affect your character’s ability to fight off the waves. Meanwhile, two slots are available for personal equipment, these consisting of melee weapons, grenades and other useful offensive of defensive items. Moreover, there’s a wide selection of different types of grenades that perform better against different species or quantities of aliens. Finally, there’s the two slots for ammo type for the turret, these being the standard ammo, of which you have an infinite amount, and the special ammo types, that run the gamut much like the grenades do. Bullets for the special ammo types need to be bought and used wisely to deal with waves. Indeed, there are many factors to consider when it comes to purchasing these weapons and equipment that will affect your survival rate.

As you defeat waves and progress, more is revealed. Boss creatures test your ability to adapt at the end of each location, providing a stiff challenge that requires you to equip yourself smartly. Meanwhile, power-ups are earned that can provide some much needed boosts to ammo, health, score, or even enhances you and your firepower temporarily. Fortunately, defeat isn’t the end, you are free to restart the wave having kept any credits earned so to spend them more wisely and maybe prevail next time. Additionally, much of the purchasable equipment can be upgraded once you’ve moved to a new location, always giving you something to spend your hard earned credits on, and soon proving crucial to keeping you alive as larger waves attack and new alien species throw something unexpected at you. Let Them Comes certainly keeps you on your toes.

Despite the challenge, however, it doesn’t take long to reach the end, and for some the frustration of overcoming the challenge is going to be too much. Afterwards you can play through again at different difficulty levels, as well as compete for high scores, but your mileage will vary depending on your patients and love of the genre and art style. Although, the time you do spend with this exhilarating and delightful tower defence title is certainly well wasted.

Thanks to Xbox and Versus Evil for supporting TiX

Prey review

Prey successfully melds science fiction and horror in a more contemporary and grounded setting that the original title from 2006. It therefore doesn’t feel at all related to its predecessor, posing question as to why it needed to use the name ‘Prey’. However, while its roots are muddy, the title that’s grown from them is wonderfully intense and intriguing, providing an experience that’s a bit familiar in places yet superbly polished.

The likeness to titles such as System Shock and Bioshock is hard to deny, with ‘mystery’ being its primary draw. You play as either a female of male Morgan Yu, waking up in your apartment and given the objective of heading to work. However, the reality of Yu’s situation is quickly challenged as something goes wrong behind the scenes, revealing Yu’s place of work to in fact be a space station in orbit around Earth, and Yu’s memory erased as an emergency protocol. Worse still, the station is infested by an alien organism known as Typhon, capable of shifting their appearance to look like everyday objects as well as sucking the life out of all living things. It’s a threat that must not be allowed to reach Earth, and despite your fractured memories, it’s up to you to figure out precisely what’s going on within the station and destroy the Typhon.

Your main objectives lead you through a well-paced and interesting story of discovery but the station is littered with side quests to further the lore. You’re free to switch between these objectives at will, with the space station open for you to explore, assuming you have the card keys, weapons and abilities to surpass the obstacles. It’s a metrovania style of free-roaming exploration that helps the environment feel more realistic and works to help satisfy your intrigue if the greater lore should grip you. Moreover, there are often multiple ways for you to conquer the obstacles in your way, whether that’s exploring and finding key cards to open otherwise locked doors, or using the neat collection of weapons to make a route – such as the Glu gun that creates clumps of solid matter to temporarily freeze enemies in place or create makeshift stairs to clamber on – or even using your abilities to hack and repair security nodes. It’s wonderfully open.

However, as much as exploration is encouraged by objectives, and required to progress, there’s an terrifically eerie personality to the station that does a tremendous job of putting you off. It’s a rare occasion of an environment looking lived in and mostly brightly lit, but the powerful sense of loneliness and the threat the Typhoon poses makes entering every room intense and frightening.

The spider-like Typhon, Mimics, can shifting into everyday objectives, fooling you into a false sense of security where a room looks harmless when in fact you’re surrounded. As you approach objects that are in fact Mimics, they shift back to their alien form and spring towards you. It makes you paranoid and puts you on edge, and with some superb scripted events in the early stages of the game, you’re quickly introduced to just how devious this enemy can be.

However, Yu does have a few tricks up his/her sleeve. The experiments you were a part of have granted you abilities which can be upgraded and expanded on through a skill tree. Additionally, new technical skills, health and stamina stats, and multiple other upgrades can be purchased and augmented with collectables. Eventually you can become a force to be reckoned with, although the further you commit to certain abilities the more you threaten your own humanity as the story progresses. It’s an interesting exploration of consequences that makes your play through a little more personal.

The use of limited stamina and inventory space adds a pleasant slice of survival horror to proceedings, enhanced considerably by the fast shifting and attacking of the Typhon as well as the wonderful use of music to intensify encounters. Running out of stamina and being unable to deal damage to the alien menace while being attacked does tread a thin line between frustrating and enhancing the horror. Meanwhile, the humanoid Typhon and human enemies require different tactics to overcome. It results in a clever set of combat encounters that force you to use a variety of different weapons and strategies to deal with the differing types and differing numbers you encounter.

A crafting feature allows you to create ammo, health and other items from machines strewn around the station. These machines use scrap and items you find, breaks them down into compound parts which can then be used to create whatever you please, assuming you have the blueprints. It means ammo and health are scarce, and improvising is encouraged. Environmental hazards can be used in combat to help even the odds, switching to different weapons is often necessary, and food items can be picked up and consumed to regain a little health and stamina. Mostly, this encourages you to avoid combat and run, enhancing the horror aspect to good effect.

Indeed, Prey does a great job delivering a smart FPS, survival horror hybrid with an intriguing setting and story. There’s some unfortunate technical limitations that can lead to some occasional frame rate issues and some long loading times between areas, but the journey of discovery and combat against the Typhon aliens aboard the space station is a highly satisfying, intense and rewarding experience. It’s a reboot that strays considerable from the original vision but successfully builds something new from the ashes of the Prey IP.

Thanks to Xbox and Bethesda for supporting TiX

XCOM 2 review

Remember that alien invasion in 2012 and the creation of the XCOM organisation to fight back under your command? Well, as it turns out, you lost. However, this feels thematically spot on. Based on your average playthrough of XCOM Enemy Unknown, with the countless soldiers you lost and retires required to win, losing the war overall makes sense and sets up this sequel rather nicely.

Now with XCOM 2, the enemy is no longer unknown and 20 years have passed since Earth was conquered. Humanity now lives alongside the aliens, seemingly benefiting from their advanced technology, but of course the aliens have their own agenda. XCOM has been reduced to a small resistance force, but once they rescue you and place you back in command, as well as secure a power core, they have the means to fight back. This time around your resources are even more limited and engagements take up a guerrilla war style; flying all over the world in a modified alien ship to search out support and aid pockets of resistance, whilst gathering the evidence needed to prove to the rest of the world that the aliens are not as benevolent as they seem.

It feel pleasantly familiar. Your home base – the modified alien ship – acts very much like it did in the previous instalment, allowing you to research new technology, upgrade and promote your troops, and build new rooms to accommodate and fulfil the advancements you need to step up your fight against the aliens. Moreover, thanks to the passing 20 years, there’s now more history involved. It’s a more personal story this time around. In fact there’s a great deal more storytelling. There’s been logical improvements to base-technologies that are easier to accept. Meanwhile, the reason for your capture by the aliens makes the fight more emotional, enhanced further by any knowledge you have from the previous title.

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Your engagements with the aliens are much different as well. You’re fighting a more tactical war this time. Rather than taking the alien menace straight on, you’re attacking strategically important targets and locations, striking from the shadows. This manifests itself in a new stealth mechanic. The majority of you missions start you concealed from the enemy, strongly encouraging you to sneak up on your targets, scope out the area as much as possible, and place your troops in the best position to attack. This is further driven home by just how effective the alien forces are.

Enemy AI is excellent. They’ll look for opportunities to flank you, they call in or wait for reinforcements so to face you with superior numbers, and their weaponry can decimate your troops in a shot or two. It’s staggeringly difficult at first, however, once you figure out all the mechanics and how to best use each class of soldier you have, things get a little easier.

Using the terrain to protect yourself and draw the enemy to you is a big part of the strategy, with elevation playing an even bigger part than in Enemy Unknown. Setting a Sharpshooter up on overwatch a fair distance from the battlefield whist your Grenadier flushes enemies out of cover can be a recipe for success. Meanwhile, Staying hidden but allowing your Ranger to get in close and slit some throats whilst your Specialist is flying a drone around to scope the area and complete the primary objective, is another sound strategy. However, XCOM 2 uses procedural map and objective generation to provide a different mission each time you leave the dropship, meaning no campaign playthrough is the same, extending XCOM 2’s longevity a great deal and putting the ownness on you to devise the best strategies. The terrain, your available units and their upgrades, your mission object, how long you can stay concealed, and the countless choices you make each turn can all add up to very different encounters with your enemy; figuring out how to deal with the hand your draw is part of the fun.

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And it is fun, hugely so. Much like its predecessor it’s tactically compelling and rewarding to figure out the puzzle that is the battlefield. This is also the case for upgrading your soldiers. Each class has two upgrade paths that benefit different styles of play, and developing enough soldiers with a diverse set of skills to help in different missions is a criticle and involved consideration. It involves you sending rookies out to gain experience, giving you the risk/reward consideration for mission success verses soldier experience. And of course, XCOM 2 is hugely challenging and your will lose countless troops, but often this is an inevitable cost to complete the objective, making the story even more personal and gripping and gives the risk/reward even more weight.

Fortunately, you can opt to retreat if an objective is too risky or difficult to complete, saving your precious squad. You can also save anywhere and reload to your heart’s content, but with no checkpoints in-mission you better remember to do so. Unfortunately, however, loading times when reloading a save are a little on the long side, which isn’t much of a surprise when you see how beautiful XCOM 2 looks.

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A varied colour palette and densely packed environments makes each mission a visual treat. Meanwhile, cinematic camera angles during the action phase of a turn builds the tension whilst superb sound effects from the weapons makes a critical shot all the more exciting and rewarding, if it hits. Of course actually hitting a target is sometimes unfair, with occasions where point blank shots on enemies miss and unobstructed lines of fire have an entirely arbitrary percentage to hit. Incidentally the aliens will also sometimes shoot straight through walls and nail impossible shots on your soldiers. Further bugs also hamper the experience slightly, with characters sometimes freezing in place and not executing commands for 10-15 seconds, and cutscenes occasionally hit frame rate problems.

Fortunately, the fun outweighs the occasional frustration; no matter how often you fail a mission there’s always plenty of alternative actions you can take to try and find success, and exploring them is joyous. Despite its steep difficulty this is a turn-based strategy masterpiece with a wonderfully engaging story to compliment it, although it is a shame that the DLC from the PC version isn’t bundled with it as standard and is instead available separately.

Thanks to Xbox and 2K Games for supporting TiX

The Final Station review

An intriguing beginning, superb ending, but highly repetitive and simplistic middle makes The Final Station a swing and a near miss as a survival horror gem. There’s some great ideas here, with its pixel art and colour palette proving some wonderful atmosphere, but its flaws outweigh a lot of the good in end.

You are a lone train conductor transporting equipment for the military, as well as survivors you find along the way, after an apocalyptic event begins. This is the second occurrence of this event, all told, with it originally occurring over a century ago. They call is the Visitation, suggesting some kind of alien menace; it results in possessed, zombie like humans lurking in buildings and on streets that mean to do the uninfected harm.

The experience is split between two sets of mechanics. On the train it’s your job to keep the bucket of bolts running, maintaining both the train itself and the equipment you’re carrying as well as keeping your passengers healthy and fed, otherwise they’ll die during the journey. When you arrive at each stop you must venture out into the world in order to find provisions to re-stock your health packs and food for the passengers, scavenge for materials to craft more bullets for your weapons, find any survivors and send them to the train, and primarily find a security code to allow you to carry on to the next station.

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As you’re exploring these stops you’ll find NPCs with titbits of information to share about the world, as well as notes that paint a larger picture of the Visitation as well as shine a light on some of your personal concerns. But these stops are also full of the infected, coloured entirely in black, apart from their eyes, making them look like extras from Limbo. These foes come in a variety of predictable classes: the ordinary shambling sort, the faster scuttling sort, stronger and finally armoured. You can try to avoid them, shoot them with a small collection of weapons – although ammo is scarce – or punch them, either with your fists of the butt of your gun.

However, what seems like a threat to begin with is soon revealed to be a mere nuisance. The lack of information The Final Station gives you at the beginning builds a false sense of difficulty that lessens significant with a few trial and error mishaps. The enemies can largely be dealt with through melee attacks, with a couple merely needing finishing off with carefully aimed bullets to the head. Meanwhile, the locations are so linear it makes exploration routine; you’re unlikely to miss anything.

The Final Station

The med packs you collect can be used to heal yourself as well as your passengers, potentially providing an interesting shared resource to manage. However, once you’ve sussed out the combat you’ll find you won’t need very many at all for yourself. Food is purely for the passengers but it’s rare enough to put your patrons at risk of starvation, so managing it to keep everyone barely alive is a bit tricky and the most likely cause of any passenger deaths.

It’s an unfortunate discovery that the challenge is predicated entirely on the lack of a tutorial, however, the setting and story are still intriguing mysteries to be explored. Underground tunnels and structures have been built that give The Final Station a War of the Worlds feel. Meanwhile, the reveal of how the equipment you’re transporting will be used is exciting and cool. However, repetition does hurt the pacing a great deal. Stations begin to mostly look the same and you’ll find yourself willing each train journey to be the end of the current act in the story. It becomes dull and predictable; any fear the infected stirred originally is completely lost in the mid-game and exploring each station becomes a chore.

The Final Station

Then things spring to life in the final act. Mysteries thicken, twists and turns trigger your fascination, questions are answered and the ending itself is brilliant. It makes the whole journey worth it.

The Final Station is an interesting survival horror that starts strong with an intriguing, mysterious and frightening force to overcome, and some clever survival mechanics during the train journeys. The middle threatens to ruin the whole adventure, stripping the fear from the enemies, revealing exploration to be linear and overstaying its welcome to make it feel repetitious. But that ending is a return to form, capitalising on the narrative superbly. It’s worth the ticket price, but only barely.

Thanks to Xbox, tinyBuild and Iron Galaxy for supporting TiX

ALIENS Universe gets ballsy with Zen Studios

We’ve been craving a decent Alien game for a while. Then just like buses, two have come along… albeit this next one is a set of pinball tables.

Zen Studios have partnered with Fox Digital Entertainment to unleash three ALIENS vs. pinball tables.

Based on the 1986 blockbuster, the star of the three tables is the iconic ALIENS featuring our favourite heroine, Ellen Ripley. Not to be left out, Alien Isolation swaps its creepy confines of the Sevastopol for the rush of pinball. Finally, Aliens’ biggest enemy, Predator, gets in on the action in the third table.

This will be one set of tables I shall definitely be picking up! Look out for the Aliens vs. Pinball pack coming to Xbox One on April 26.

 

 

Fortified! review

Fortified! melds 1950s sci-fi with tower defence wonderfully. Alien saucers and a plethora of robots that wouldn’t look out of place in films such as Lost in Space and War of the Worlds, march forwards towards rockets armed with nuclear warheads, as you and up to three fellow heroes protect these rockets over multiple attacking waves. Once the waves have finished the onslaught, the rocket or rockets launch and strike back at the alien invaders.

It’s a simple premise with only the mere slither of story but one that proves enjoyable and compelling thanks to it’s strong aesthetic identity and accessible mechanics. However, this is a title best enjoyed with friends, utilising each character’s unique abilities to push back the horde of aliens and robots.

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The Agent, the Spaceman, the Captain, and the Rocket Scientist are your choice of characters, with their diverse set of skills allowing them to deal with enemies in some neat ways. The Captain keeps things simple with a shotgun and machine gun, while the Spaceman has a freeze gun, the Rocket Scientist carries a high-damage grenade launcher and laser pistol, meanwhile the Agent can deploy snipers for support. Working together the four heroes pack a significant punch and can dispatch the invading menace in creatively entertaining ways. Furthermore, each character has a special move they can activate once they fill a meter, inducing temporary invulnerability as well as activating a unique ability, such as the Captain’s air strikes or the Rocket Scientist’s jetpack.

To destroy the robots and aliens it’s a matter of working together to protect the routes to the rockets – of which there can be more than one – by combating enemies directly in third person combat and by placing down weapons between waves. You can place turrets, troops, anti-air, anti-tank, artillery and more to help protect the rockets and aid you in the fight, but they cost money – that you earn by destroying foes – and you’re restricted on what you can build by a limited inventory for each stage as well as the need to upgrade to unlock better equipment.

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Each character levels up independently, and as they do you can unlock new weapons and upgrades for them to wield as well as new defence equipment. When in-game, you must choose your arsenal of weapons and defence equipment before the waves begin, adding a slight tactical consideration. Your choice is further guided by indicators of what kinds of enemies you’re going to face in the coming waves, so you’ll know whether or not anti-air, for example, is worth bringing into the fight.

It’s a good upgrade system that encourages you to grind the easier levels to better prepare yourself for the tougher ones ahead. Furthermore it encourages you to switch between characters rather than stick with just the one. Of course this does also feel a bit like padding out the experience, but fortunately it’s enjoyable enough to where it’s a forgivable design choice.

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A 12 level campaign as well as an infinite waves, endurance-style Invasion Mode are available for you to tackle either alone or with up to three friends, but with a limit on how many things you can place to help defend, as well as the aggressive attacks of the invaders. The two modes feel very similar, testing the might and cooperation of your team. But it certainly proves enjoyable. Moreover the crisp and colourful visuals with the 1950s aesthetic is eye pleasing and runs smooth throughout.

Fortified! is a great tower defence game with a quirky enough premise to standout amongst its peers. It’s certainly more fun to play with others than tackle the invaders alone but if you are able to bring together a group you can easily while away the hours avenging the earth.

Thanks to Xbox and Clapfoot for their support

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Alien Isolation the Collection stalks Xbox One

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This week Sega have pushed out the Alien Isolation Collection, and what a perfect time of year to do so, the collection comes to you as a digital only version which contains the game and seven packs of DLC that were released periodically since its original release.

Relive the horror you went through the first time and then some as you try to survive for longer than before with all of the additional content.

Alien Isolation – The Collection can be found on the Xbox One store for $39.99 and you can check out our review from the original Alien Isolation here.

Alien: Isolation Review

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In 1979 Ridley Scott introduced us to Ellen Ripley and the Alien saga. Now 35 years later in 2014 Alien: Isolation has come to next generation gaming consoles. Developed by The Creative Assembly and published by Sega, Alien Isolation was released on October 7th for Xbox One and Xbox 360.

Alien: Isolation is part of the Aliens series and fits in perfectly to the story fans already know and love. The game is set in 2137, fifteen years after the events of Alien. The game follows Amada Ripley, daughter of Ellen Ripley, who whilst working for Weyland-Yutani is investigating the disappearance of her mother. Character Christopher Samuels immediately approaches Amanda in the opening sequence to inform her that the flight recorder of the Nostromo was recently located by a ship named the Anesidora and is being held aboard Sevastopol Station, a remote free port space station owned by the Seegson Corporation. Christopher Samuels is quick to offer Amanda a place on the Weyland-Yutani team sent to retrieve it hoping that Amanda will finally find some closure. Ripley (Amanda) joins Christopher Samuels, and corporative executive Nina Taylor and heads off to Sevastopol on board a courier ship, the Torrens, owned by Captain Verlaine. Arriving at Sevastopol the group find the station damaged and its communications unreliable. Ripley, Samuels, and Taylor attempt to spacewalk over to the station to investigate, but during the walk their EVA line is severed by debris crashing through the station and (unsurprisingly – this is a survival horror title after all) Ripley is separated from them and forced to enter the station on her own. The players fight for survival begins now.

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Alien: Isolation isn’t the first attempt to bring to life the Alien saga in video games. Since the initial films release there have been a number of titles based upon the series. The majority of them, if we are being honest with one another, are downright shocking. What is extremely apparent from Alien: Isolation is we’ve been waiting for technology to catch up to enable our front rooms to bring to life the fear and horror of the Alien movies.

The development team behind Alien: Isolation are probably best known for their work in the award winning and critically acclaimed Total War series. The story goes that a six-person team created a small multiplayer demo in which one player assumed the role of a Xenomorph to play an Alien inspired version of “hide and seek”. Having pitched the idea to Sega executives the project was approved and The Creative Assembly team got to work.

The developers, wanting to capture the horror and feel of the first film, ensured that although Alien: Isolation is set in the future, the technology within the game is modelled after the first Alien film. Jon McKellan, Lead Art Designer for Alien: Isolation was quoted saying

We had this rule. If a prop couldn’t have been made in 1979 with the things that they had around, then we wouldn’t make it either.

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20th Century Fox provided The Creative Assembly with three terabytes of archived data related to the original Alien film, including notes on prop and set design, behind the scenes photos, videos, and the film’s original sound effect recordings, to help Creative Assembly authentically recreate the atmosphere of the film. The Alien because of this is incredibly well detailed and animated but that isn’t the only part of the game that stands up to scrutiny. The entire game pays homage to the films that inspired it. The level design, weapons and film grain effect seems right out of the movies and overall, this makes Alien: Isolation one of the more cinematic feeling games I’ve seen and played in years.

There are two Kinect specific features in Alien: Isolation which are both intended to add to the player’s feeling of immersion. Head-tracking does what it says on the tin and allows you to move left or right, forward and back while hiding, and at no point did this feel out of place. The second feature is one that caught me out on a couple of occasions; noise detection. With this enabled, your own environment and noise within it become a part of the game. A text message alert, cough or even the opening of a Pepsi Max bottle can be end of you. Be warned.

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During Alien: Isolation it isn’t just the Xenomorph, as menacing as it is, that is your only concern. You’ll need to be prepared to face not just menacing humans but also Androids who have turned deadly, a corporation who cares little for the stations remaining inhabitants and dangerous environments which will test you and threaten your survival. The further you progress through the station and unravel what is happening the Xenomorph will become more of a threat. Watch. Every. Step. The Creative Assembly designed the Alien so that it cannot be killed and instead of following a predetermined path, the artificial intelligence of the Alien has been programmed to actively hunt for you by sight, sound and smell.

Aside from the Campaign in Alien: Isolation there is a secondary game type called Survivor Mode. This mode tasks players with completing a number of objectives within a certain area of the station and within a specified time limit. Not as easy as you’d think.

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As a fan of the Alien series, having watched all the movies countless times, even read books (including fan fiction), I feel in love with Alien: Isolation even if my nerves didn’t. The games graphics and intelligent (and unpredictable) AI keeps the game moving along at a pace which doesn’t let up.

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Alien: Isolation Features Voices and Likenesses of 1979 Original Cast

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Before you go getting way over excited about the news that the original cast of the 1979 box office hit Alien, has their voices in the game – this is set to feature on two downloadable bonus levels as revealed by a press release today from SEGA and Twentieth Century Fox.

Alien: Isolation, features the vocal talent and likenesses of key cast members of the 1979 Ridley Scott masterpiece, Alien. Academy Award-nominated and Golden Globe-winner Sigourney Weaver (Ellen Ripley) , Tom Skerritt (Dallas) , Veronica Cartwright (Lambert) , Harry Dean Stanton (Brett) , Yaphet Kotto (Parker) and Ian Holm (Ash, likeness and sound-alike) are set to feature in two downloadable bonus missions, which allow you to relive two classic scenes from the movie.

Anyone in the UK who pre-orders the game will get a free upgrade to the Nostromo Edition, which includes the bonus content “Crew Expendable”. Players can choose to play as one of three surviving crewmembers, only moments after Brett’s death at the jaws of the creature. As Ellen Ripley, Dallas or Parker, players can explore the Nostromo from habitation deck down through engineering, coordinating their efforts with Lambert and Ash to lure the Alien into the ship’s airlock.

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In addition, consumers who pre-order at select retailers will also receive “Last Survivor” in which players pick up the story as Ripley tries to escape on the Narcissus. On hearing the screams of Lambert and Parker, players must navigate their way back down through the Nostromo in order to activate the self-destruct sequence, before retracing their steps back to the Narcissus shuttle and their escape.

Alien: Isolation is a first-person survival horror game capturing the fear and tension evoked by Ridley Scott’s 1979 classic film. Players find themselves in an atmosphere of constant dread and mortal danger as an unpredictable, ruthless Xenomorph is stalking and killing deep in the shadows. Underpowered and underprepared, you must scavenge resources, improvise solutions and use your wits, not just to succeed in your mission, but to simply stay alive.

Alien: Isolation will be available from October 7th, 2014, for Xbox One, Xbox 360 and other platforms.

Alien: Isolation spotted on Xbox Live Game Store

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Trademarks were found for an upcoming Alien game being developed by Creative Assembly back in October, and it seems that the game has now been officially announced as it has found itself being advertised on the Xbox Live Game Store.

The blurb on the Game Store reads, “Discover the true meaning of fear in Alien: Isolation, a survival horror set in an atmosphere of constant dread and mortal danger. Fifteen years after the events of Alien, Ellen Ripley’s daughter, Amanda enters a desperate battle for survival, on a mission to unravel the truth behind her mother’s disappearance. As Amanda, you will navigate through an increasingly volatile world as you find yourself confronted on all sides by a panicked, desperate population and an unpredictable, ruthless Alien. Underpowered and underprepared, you must scavenge resources, improvise solutions and use your wits, not just to succeed in your mission, but to simply stay alive.“

There are also five screenshots (along with the box art) which can be seen on Xbox.com.

We’re also led to believe that the game was said to feature both single-player, and four-player co-op but the latter has since been removed from the information given about the title.

*Update* – and here’s a trailer, released just a short while ago.