Tag Archives: Funny

Shaq Fu: A Legend Reborn review

The original Shaq Fu received mostly positive reviews at launch, but as time passed it gained the notoriety of being terrible, one of the worst games ever made in fact. Certainly, a sequel or reimagining didn’t seem likely, but after a successful Indiegogo campaign here we have Shaq Fu: A Legend Reborn, and what a pleasant surprise it is.

Shaq Fu: A Legend Reborn ditches the original Mortal Kombat style tournament fighting setup for a side-scrolling beat ‘em up one instead, and it’s a great fit. Playing as Shaquille O’Neil (Shaq) you fight your way through six locations beating the life out of the many anthropomorphised demons that mean to stop you, before engaging a more varied and grotesque demon boss at the end of each one.

Combat is wonderfully simple and smooth, with a normal attack doing the majority of the work, a heavier shield-breaking attack, a dodge, a dash, and a powerful limited use attack rounding off the compliment of moves. Each one is gradually taught to you as they become necessary; it’s an intuitive move-set that proves fast, effective and fun.

Enemies are varied enough to encourage you to think about what move best suits a situation and which threats are best taken out first, but it’s still a fairly mindless brawler, to its credit that is. Instead you can focus on just how satisfying it is to beat up these enemies, seeing the occasional goon fly towards the screen and crack it, and watch bemused when Shaq randomly unleashes an exaggerated attack involving high kicks and body slamming. It’s silly, over-the-top fun.

The over-the-top-ness continues with the presentation, with crisp, bright cartoon visuals bringing the levels and characters to life, and some excellent caricature design for the enemies. The is especially shown off during the animated storytelling sequences between levels, where the characterisation is brought to life with excellent animation and wonderful transformations as the demons turn from human to demon form. Furthermore, a funny script that’s well acted does its part to make this reimagining feel thoroughly modern.

Indeed, there’s a story to follow as well, and while it begins only as a means to drive you forwards, it soon becomes intriguing, amusing and immersive. Demons hiding as celebrities, Shaq’s peculiar mentor and friends, all help to create a funny adventure and include the occasional fourth-wall breaking jokes. It all feels a bit Deadpool starring Shaq.

Unfortunately, despite the adventure only taking a few hours to complete, the combat scenarios do get repetitive. The odd special transformation for Shaq, a cactus suit and a mech suit, help with variety, as do the occasional environmental hazard, but the majority of play is spent fighting waves of enemies and gradually moving to the right. Additionally, we did run in to a couple of bugs during one boss fight, which was frustrating.

Once the short story is concluded there’s very little to entice you back. A lack of multiplayer is a crying shame and feels like it might have been the silver bullet to keep Shaq Fu interesting after completion, but alas. Instead there’s a Shaq-o-pedia to look up information on enemies and the like, as well as additional difficulty levels, but otherwise nothing to temp you.

Shaq Fu: A Legend Reborn certainly provides a fun and amusing single player beat ‘em up experience. The lack of multiplayer, lack of variety, and overall shortness hurt it a little but there’s no denying how enjoyable it is the first time playing through.

Thanks to Wired Productions for supporting TiX

TiX podcast special: State of the Industry 2017

Welcome to a new episode of the TiX Podcast, a special episode celebrating 2017.

Join Greg Giddens and Neale Jarrat as they discuss their highlights from the year in terms of games, explore the new hardware paradigm of the Xbox One X and PS4 Pro, gush over PSVR, and even take a quick stab at the loot box controversy. Welcome to State of the Industry 2017.

Podcast music by Bangmaid
Produced by James Gill
www.mixcloud.com/bangmaid

Fart your way into South Park: The Fractured But Whole

Does your fart have what it takes to secure a starring role in South Park: The Fractured But Whole? Well if it does then Ubisoft wants to hear from you.

Ubisoft have announced the ‘I Am The Fart’ contest, where the winner will have the honour of having the sound of their own fart integrated into the game as one of the New Kid’s lethal ‘weapons’.

This is a worldwide contest that will run until October 16th. To enter all you need to do is post a video showing off your smelly skills on the website: www.iamthefart.com.

After the submission period, the jury, composed of members from the San Francisco Studio, Mr Methane as well as a representative from South Park Digital Studios, will choose the winner, who will travel to Ubisoft San Francisco to record their sound for the game.

Some people have unknowingly been training all their lives for a contest such as this. It’s time to let it rip.

TiX Podcast S1E2 Post-E3 2017

Welcome to the new This is Xbox Podcast.

Join Greg Giddens and Damien Ashley for a new episode of the This is Xbox Podcast.

This episode follows on from the last show and discusses what was shown and announced at E3 2017. Greg and Damien discuss their thoughts on the conferences and their highlights with some of the TiX team contributing their own feelings in short audio segments throughout the show.

https://soundcloud.com/thisisxboxpodcast/tix-podcast-s1e2-post-e3-2017

Podcast music by Bangmaid
Produced by James Gill
www.mixcloud.com/bangmaid

TiX Podcast S1E1 E3 2017

Welcome to the new This is Xbox Podcast.

Join Greg Giddens, Damien Ashley and Adrian Garlike for a new season of the This is Xbox Podcast.

This episode is the first in a new format for the TiX Podcast. After a 9 month break, Greg is back with a new co-host, Damien, to discuss E3 2017, with TiX staff writer Adrian Garlike joining as a guest.

https://soundcloud.com/thisisxboxpodcast/tix-podcast-s1e1-e3-2017

Podcast music by Bangmaid
Produced by James Gill
www.mixcloud.com/bangmaid

Human: Fall Flat review

Protagonist Bob in Human: Fall Flat is akin to a toddler learning to walk. He haphazardly stumbles around the environments, bumping into objects and clinging on to them like a drunk trying to steady himself. It’s delightfully humorous and charming, and when he drops from a significant height and crumples to the floor with theatrical, squishy ragdoll physics – suggesting he possesses no bones whatsoever – it’s hard not to concoct more and more dangerous activities for poor Bob to undertake, just for fun. Indeed, that’s a large part of the fun, but there’s a physics puzzle game here as well, one that’s brief but clever and funny enough to leave a lasting impression.

The colourless, devoid of detail, anthropomorphic blob that is Bob is essentially a crash test dummy for you to experiment with. The environments are equally devoid of details, with block colours on austere textures but it’s a unique aesthetic that’s easy on the eyes. With an editor, you can personalize Bob to your heart’s content, and let your creative juices flow somewhat, but the visuals quickly take a back seat to the physics.

Human: Fall Flat’s objective is to solve a set of puzzles and platforming challenges in order to reach the end of the level, with each level sporting a different theme, such as a building site, a mountain pass, and a medieval castle. You don’t really control Bob per se, instead you try to steer him around the environment, moving objects, pulling and pushing levers and switches, and otherwise clearing the way to the exit. It starts off simple, with a couple of tutorial levels teaching you the basics, before larger, more complex levels really start to get your grey matter working. Experimenting with the environment and Bob to see just what can be done within the physics engine encourages you to explore the environments and discover multiple methods to master the madness.

Indeed then, it’s a humorous game and bringing a friend along for some coop fun takes it up a notch, as you uncontrollably giggle your way through each level. But whether alone or with a friend, Human: Fall Flat remains fun and intriguing, and while Bob is sure to fall off cliffs, get squished with boulders, and make suffer less than graceful trips and falls a few too many times, figuring out the puzzles and making it to the exit is hugely satisfying. Meanwhile, the puzzles can often be solved multiple different ways, adding some replayability and a spark of creativity to your play-through.

Human: Fall Flat is a charming physics platformer and puzzler but also a very short one. The multiple solutions to puzzles as well as the coop mode offer some replayability, and the pacing ensures the concept and humour don’t out stay their welcome, but still it’s all over with disappointingly swiftly. However, it’s certainly an afternoon well spent.

Thanks to Xbox and Curve Digital for supporting TiX

Bulletstorm: Full Clip Edition review

It’s not often that I’ll play a first-person shooter other than Halo. It’s even less often that it’s a re-imagining of a title that was first released on the Xbox 360. Bulletstorm: Full Clip Edition from People Can Fly is one such game.

Bulletstorm isn’t usually the type of title I’d pick up. Not because I don’t like first person shooters, more the fact that I’m not a massive fan of being led around by the nose. I’m much more of an exploration kind of shooter fan than scripted paths and direction. That being said, I went into Bulletstorm with an open mind, especially as I’d not played the initial Xbox 360 release from 2011. I was pleasantly surprised.

Taking place in the 26th Century, Bulletstorm sees you take the role of Grayson Hunt. Grayson is the leader of Dead Echo, a covert hit squad under the direct command of Star General Sarrano of the Confederation of Planets. Sarrano, unsurprisingly, uses Dead Echo to clean up some of his dirty work, and, learning this, Grayson and his team desert. They become Space Pirates and ten years on, encounter Sarrano’s cruiser, the Ulysses, ramming it over the planet Stygia. Your story is taken up from there on in.

Initially, you have a few tasks to perform to save the life of team member Ishi Sato. Ishi was critically wounded during the crash and has been repaired by the damaged ship’s medical systems using cybernetic and robotic components. The AI on this repair is rather aggressive, however, turning Ishi into something of a loose cannon. During the initial search for power, you find an Instinct Leash.

Bulletstorm

This device is an interactive energy whip and tactical points-scoring system. The more kills that Grayson performs, in the most creative manner, the more points that you will earn. More points equals more ammunition and weapon upgrades as you progress through the game.

The weapons that Grayson has access to range in type and effectiveness. The weapon select allows you to choose between the primary automatic rifle and two secondary weapons. Choosing wisely could mean the difference between progressing on to the next chapter, or dying a horrible death at the hands of the local hybrid-mutant population of nuclear-winter crazies. You have good selection of combat weapons to choose from. From  a magnum-type pistol  to an explosive tipped flail chain launcher, there should be fun for everyone in the loadouts.

The loadouts are accessed through the Instinct Leash communicating your kill-score to drop-kits. You can choose to upgrade the weapons in your arsenal and purchase more ammo, but in truth, you’ll probably max out your ammo as there are so many crazies around, you’ll be buried in spent casings.

Bulletstorm

Importantly, the weapons are fun to use. There’s nothing worse than finding out that the firepower at your disposal is drab and lifeless, or worse still, ineffective. The standard automatic rifle does feel slightly underpowered though, and you can find yourself emptying clip after clip into certain enemy types before you try something else. The Instinct Leash allows you to get creative too. You can use it to whip enemies from behind cover towards you or into hazards like giant spikes, electrical wires or hungry plants. This can rack up your points and can be a source of amusement as you whip them towards you and give them a hefty boot away while trying to take their head off with a well-placed bullet.

There are a number of local mutant types that will come at you without hesitation as well. There’s no sneaking around trying to avoid conflict in this one, its full-on, in your face violence here. Once these are out of the way, by whatever means you have at your disposal, hell, even kick them off a platform, they will drop something useful, like a small amount of ammo. You can even use the Instinct Leash to pick that up if you’re desperate.

As you make your way to specific locations throughout the ravaged city, using a pre-defined path, you will eventually come up against a heavier boss battle before progressing to the next Act or Chapter. These will sometimes involve a little more of the story being revealed or occasionally, will suggest something other than a professional relationship blooming between Grayson and Ishi. Odd.

Bulletstorm

Bulletstorm: Full Clip Edition has had a graphics update by all accounts, although not having played the original, I wouldn’t be in a position to comment on the differences. It also provides the Overkill Campaign mode, granting immediate access to all of the available weapons as well as six new Echo maps. There is also a great Duke Nukem’s Bulletstorm Tour DLC available with voice clips from Jon St.John himself.

The voice-acting in Bulletstorm is OK. It won’t win the game any awards and some of the dialogue is pretty cheesy, but it helps to keep the game, and more importantly the story, clipping along at a fair old pace, and there’s plenty to keep you entertained throughout. There are several hours of gameplay in the story alone and with multiplayer, Overkill and the Duke Nukem optional DLC, there’s enough to keep you seriously entertained for a long time to come. With all of that in mind, is there anything I don’t really like about Bulletstorm Full Clip Edition?

Well, I can’t help but feel that it’s all a bit samey. The mutants either come at you in some sort of suicidal frenzy or they hide and try to pick you off, making a swift Leashing inevitable. There’s little variation in the attacks or the way you end up defeating the hordes of nutters trying to end your existence. There’s no health indicator either. Take too much damage, and to be fair Grayson can take a lot, and the edges of your HUD turn red until you hide for a bit of time. This can be irritating of you’re in the middle of an important boss fight.

Bulletstorm

On the whole, Bulletstorm: Full Clip Edition lives up to the hype of the original release. The graphics are futuristically gory in a good way and most things are pretty well animated. The story keeps you engaged throughout and the voice-acting, while not Oscar-worthy, is good enough to get you through the cheesy dialogue. Save for repetitive waves of attacks and being led around a specific route to your goal, the game is well worth picking up to add to your collection.

Thanks to People Can Fly and Xbox for supporting TiX

Our latest videos as of 5th March

We’re striving to create more video content, and this week has seen a whopping six pieces come out. If you missed them on our YouTube channel then don’t fear, because you can also find them embedded below.

Greg gets angry again, this time with Resident Evil 7 on Madhouse difficulty:

Our Thursday stream on Beam has been uploaded in its entirety on YouTube for all to see:

Rob’s been busy with Resident Evil 7 and produced three let’s play videos this week:

And finally, our stream from last week on Twitch was uploaded to YouTube for all to see:

Graveyard Keeper announced

In the mood for a humorous, pixel art, medieval cemetery management sim? Then Graveyard Keeper could be for you.

Coming out later this year on Xbox One, Graveyard Keeper lets you build and manage your own graveyard while finding shortcuts to cut costs, expand into entertainment with witch-burning festivals, and scare nearby villagers into attending church. This is a game of capitalism and doing whatever it takes to build a thriving business.

Pixel Heroes: Byte & Magic releasing March 3rd on Xbox One

Pixel Heroes, from developer The Bitfather and publisher Headup Games, will be hitting digital shelves on March 3rd, bring it’s nostalgia inducing, amusing, retro-style RPG to Xbox One. You can get a taste of what’s the come, and the kind of humour involved, in the trailer below:

This Roguelike RPG promises a world full of hilarious events and characters, and plenty of deadly dungeons to test your adventuring might and reward you will copious amounts of loot.

It’s set to feature:

•Thirty unique hero classes to unlock, each with individual skills and attributes.
•More procedurally generated axes, spears, maces, swords, shields, bows, crossbows, spells and prayers than a llama has hair on its body.
•Thirteen mystic and beautifully cruel dungeons to explore. Epic bossfights waiting!
•Three campaigns to unlock, each with its own final dungeon and boss.
•Permadeath! You know you want it.
•A detailed graveyard where you can mourn your dead heroes, compare their statistics and see which of their choices led to their tragic death.
•Completely crazy NPCs, each one of them with a significant storyline that you can follow to unlock cool stuff!
•Tons of random events that you will encounter on your way, expecting you to make important choices. Will you yell at the cat like a crazy idiot?
•Many achievements and unlockables, try to get them all and become the most badass Pixel Hero in the world!