Tag Archives: Metal Gear Solid V The Phantom Pain

Metal Gear Survive review

After many minutes of cutscenes, several hints at gameplay without, in fact, participation, followed by mere moments of interactivity before the next slew of dialogue and exposition kicked in, I knew I was playing a Metal Gear game. Indeed, despite the apparent departure from the tried and tested formula, Metal Gear Survive has all the same elements you might expect from the series, making it a pleasant surprise after what the open Beta suggested it would be.

As the title suggests, Metal Gear Survive is focused on survival, and this mixes up the usual stealth play and action quite well with expanded mechanics that we saw hints of in previous Metal Gear games. You must now manage your thirst and hunger, which are frequent concerns, especially early on. This involves finding food and clean water and regularly consuming them, which in turn affects your health and stamina. Allow hunger or dehydration to get the better of you and your physical abilities suffer considerably, reducing your combat effectiveness and movement therefore putting you in grave danger against your foes.

These foes take the shape of zombie-esque characters; ferocious, animalistic adversaries that mean to tear you apart. They’re called Wanderers and inhabit a dimension called Dite, a world where you find yourself after an attack on Mother Base from the end of Metal Gear Solid V: Ground Zeroes. You’re not alone in this strange world however, other survivors are scattered around the large, open play area, and they can be found and recruited to help build and maintain your own base of operations, as you seek to discover the fate of a previously deployed unit to this dimension and a ways to escape it.

Managing your immediate needs of thirst and hunger make up only a small part of the overall management system. Your health is threatened by raw meat and dirty water, so medication is required to treat illness, while upgraded facilities are required to prevent illness in the first place. Meanwhile, every scrap of material is precious. This scrap is essential, allowing you to build new crafting stations at your base, new equipment and weapons to aid you, and defences to help keep the Wanderers at bay. This amalgamates in building up your base and outposts to be safe, self-maintained havens for you and the other survivors. And indeed, they soon become just that, with farms growing the all-important food you need and the other survivors even helping maintain it all as well as allowing you to send them on missions of their own. It’s gruelling, desperate survival initially but eventually gives way to rewarding progress and order.

Then there’s the story, which is surprisingly deep and intriguing. The Beta gave the impression of a cooperative survival game with equipment upgrades measuring progress, but in fact there’s a lengthy tale of political intrigue with plenty of twists and turns and pleasant links to The Phantom Pain. This is so much more than just a survival game that means to encourage emergent gameplay, there’s a story here worthy of the series. The multiplayer offering of teams of four protecting an area against swarms of Wanderers is but a small part of the experience, an optional part for more resources.

The meat of Metal Gear Survive is in the single-player offering, of searching for information about the lost unit, the Charon Corps, and figuring out a way back home while enduring the harsh environment. It’s a different kind of Metal Gear, and a riskier one at that, but there’s also something refreshing about it. Newcomers are likely to find this to be a survival game that’s challenging with a surprisingly heavy handed slice of exposition, meanwhile, Metal Gear fans may find something gripping and different about the experience. Post Kojima Konami may not be entirely without hope after all when it comes to this series. There is, of course, the £10 save slot debacle, and indeed that’s anti-consumer, over-priced nonsense, but the rest of the micro transactions are less offensive, allowing you to buy additional load-out slots and unit slots to send on missions. They are entirely optional extras that most will never feel the urge to indulge in.

While Metal Gear Survive is surprising in its single-player offering and story, it still suffers some missteps. Defending against waves of Wanderers and fetching data from computer terminals are the primary missions on offer, with side missions merely pointing you towards additional resources you can gather. It all gets a bit repetitive, especially once you devise a few winning strategies for dealing with the Wanderer hordes. Meanwhile, despite the lengthy story and its twists, character development is a bit lacking. Your character is fully customisable but mostly silent with no real personality beyond the one you imprint on them, and those that are explored come across as dull and uninspired. There’s no Kojima magic here for zany characters. Certainly there’s enough intrigue here to help keep you playing to see how it all comes together but it’s more supernatural than military sci-fi this time around.

Metal Gear Survive isn’t what it appeared to be. This isn’t a multiplayer mode stretched out into a full release, instead it’s an experimental title in the series with the same single-player dedication but some new and expanded survival mechanics running the show. As a survival game it’s a fun and challenging experience, whether played single-player or multiplayer, as a Metal Gear game it’s one of the weaker titles but certainly not without its charms.

Thanks to Xbox and Konami for supporting TiX

Game of the Year

GotY

Tomorrow 2015 comes to a close and it’s been a spectacular year for gaming. We’ve seen some exceptionally good titles this year, largely from sequels that have made smart choices to enhance their stories and mechanics, and whilst new IPs and new ideas are a little thin on the ground the abundance of quality titles is still excellent.

Throughout the Christmas period we’ve been revealing our top three games from a number of different categories, now we reveal the top three for our most coveted award: The TiX Game of the Year 2015.

Third Place – Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain

Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain is excellent. It’s hugely ambitious with sky high expectations from it ravenous fan base, and yet it still manages to surprise, even astound us with its excellence.

…its open-world design is unmatched in the action and/or stealth genre, offering extreme freedom that offers oodles of replayability, and the story is intriguing, profound and subtly spun with a focus on action rather than words.

Says Greg Giddens (me) in his review, and indeed the TiX team all agreed that The Phantom Pain’s tactical open-world was rich with adventure, action, and opportunities to make you own decisions. It’s one of the most impressive titles for scope we’ve yet seen.

Moreover, the intriguing story, excellent gunplay and oodles of content make this an experience that lasts and sticks with you. No wonder it managed to secure a spot in our top three games of the year.

Check out the review here.

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Second Place – Fallout 4

…exploration is profusely rewarding. Every nook and cranny hides ammo, medical supplies, crafting and building resources, wasteland lore, easter eggs, enemies, missions and general adventure. It’s meticulously crafted to look lived-in as well as match aesthetically with every other aspect of the title. It’s truly a delight to roam this nuclear wasteland.

Says Greg Giddens (me) in his review, and it’s this vast post-apocalyptic world and it’s abundance of adventure that kept us coming back to it time and time again.

The TiX team fell in love with Fallout 4, much like we did with The Witcher 3, causing us to jump between the two when trying to decide which one was the better game. In the end the choice really came down to whether you were in the mood for a land of fantasy or of post nuclear war, and fantasy took the top spot.

Check out the review here.

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TiX Game of the Year – The Witcher 3: The Wild Hunt

With its incredible base game blowing out minds with its visuals, narrative, and vast world, and then for DLC and patches to come at a fast rate to improve it even more, it’s no surprise that The Witcher 3 grabbed our hearts and wouldn’t let go.
Richard Berry described it in his review as:

I can’t remember the last time an RPG gripped me so much, and it’s thanks to CD Projekt RED’s masterful crafting of the story and allowing me to play out some incredible adventures within the vast open world of Tamaria – The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt is about as close as it comes to being my ideal game.

And it really is that close to being an RPG fan’s ideal game. It’s a remarkable feat of design and we simply can’t wait for the second DLC to hit in 2016.

Congratulations to The Witcher 3: The Wild Hunt, you are our Game of the Year 2015.

Check out the review here.

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That’s it for another year. We can’t wait to see what 2016 brings.

Honourable mentions go to Rise of the Tomb Raider, Halo 5 Guardians, and Elite Dangerous, all of which were nominated by the TiX staff but didn’t quite make the cut.

Action Adventure Game of the Year

Action ADventure GotY

The year is coming to a close and so it’s time once again to take a look back at all the great games that have been released in 2015.

Every day up until the end of the year we’ll be revealing our top three games from a number of different categories, all the way up until the coveted Game of the Year reveal.

Next up is Action Adventure Game of the Year.

Third Place – Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain

Greg Giddens (me) started off his review of MGSV: TPP with:

Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain is excellent. It’s hugely ambitious with sky high expectations from it ravenous fan base, and yet it still manages to surprise, even astound us with its excellence.

And truer world have never been said, if I do say so myself.

The Phantom Pain offers a tactical open-world to experience that is abundant in emergent gameplay opportunities. You can approach missions practically however you like, and with the huge amount of equipment you can research you can then replay these missions dozens of times and experience them completely differently.

Greg goes on to say:

…its open-world design is unmatched in the action and/or stealth genre, offering extreme freedom that offers oodles of replayability, and the story is intriguing, profound and subtly spun with a focus on action rather than words.

And indeed with such strong mechanics, such an enticing open-world, and of course the classic Metal Gear story driving the experience, it’s no wonder to see MGS V grace our list of top action adventure titles from this year.

Check out the review here.

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Second Place – Dying Light

Techland learnt their lessons from Dead Island and put them into practice with Dying Light. The result is a scary and intense action horror title that’s oodles of fun to play, alone or with friends.

Richard Berry said in his review:

Dying Light is huge, it’s loaded with challenges and collectibles with enough missions to see you easily rack up in excess of 50 hours game time. It’s certainly the most fun I’ve had in co-op since Borderlands 2. For me the dynamic day/night cycle is the stand out feature with the night cycle offering a completely different change of pace.

The terrifying night cycle, the exceptionally fun parkour movement, and the stiff but well-balanced challenge, makes Dying Light a superb action adventure game, and one that so very nearly took top spot in out awards.

Check out the review here.

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Action Adventure Game of the Year – Rise of the Tomb Raider

Crystal Dynamics have sussed out Tomb Raider. They’ve rebuilt Lara as a more human and relatable characters, created stunningly beautiful and complex environments to explore, and giving player precisely the mechanics they need to fully engage with Lara and her thirst for exploration. It’s a hugely impressive reboot of the long running franchise, and this second instalment since the reboot improves on the first in every way.

Dave Moran said in his review:

The story this time is much better than the previous game, it feels more gritty and every time I thought I was nearing the end, something else came along. The different locations are excellent, and the game looks stunning

And indeed it’s this exceptional design and ultimately hugely enjoyable experience which places Lara’s latest adventure top of your action adventure list.

Check out the review here.

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Be sure to check out the site again tomorrow to see the next category and its winner.

Honourable mentions go to Life is Strange, Elite Dangerous, King’s Quest and Mad Max, all of which were nominated by the TiX staff but didn’t quite make the cut.

Christmas Gunplay

Yes it’s still November, but, Hark the herald angels sing “Glory to the new-born king” …of Christmas gunplay games that is!

Damn, wouldn’t you know it but it’s nearly bloody Christmas again, and with the arrival of the festive season just around the corner our wish list is littered with all the pre-crimbo games we’ve been waiting for all year.

Whilst there are many games out there worthy of your desire, I’m going to look here at some of the top titles competing for your hard-earned cash or that elusive top spot on your Christmas list this year that are centred around gunplay.

First up, cult classic Call of Duty

I worked out I have spent nearly nine months of my life to date playing Call of Duty online. That’s just in game time. New little people have been conceived and born in the time I’ve spent on virtual battlefields under the CoD titles.

Ghosts and Advanced Warfare both failed to meet the mark for me, I found they lacked the holding power of previous versions. Black Ops III, however, has recaptured some of the series’ original magic. This game has pulled me back in big time.

Whilst the single player story doesn’t endear you to the cast as strongly as it clearly want to the new load-out system and skills means it’s actually really fun to play still. And of course with Treyarch producing it means more zombie action. Woo-hoo! They’ve nailed it with slick graphics and a wonderful 1940’s setting. I’m yet to get very far – my friends suck. I hope your reading this – but the Easter eggs keep me coming back for more. Zombie slaying is just as fun as in previous titles and this time a new array of weapons are available that can be customised pre ‘off the wall purchase’. Chuck me some gum – new perks instead of bottles – I’m going for the pack-a-punch.

As expected though it’s the multiplayer that really shouts out loud. Ultra quick paced play, maps that support fluid movement, great level design that gets you using the new jump packs and wall running as well as a neat slide all makes the running and gunning feel terrific. Tons of slick-looking and shooting weapons with strong variety allowing for many viable weapon setups to please most play styles, indeed the series has come back strong with this one. It’s highly addictive and well put together. Rather obviously, this will do well and I’m sure many of your mates will already have it.

Black Ops 3 Zombies

Halo 5

I have a lot of love for the Halo series. It’s my personal favourite storyline in gaming – Halo 1-3 – and it’s been continued by 343 very well. They clearly want to put their own stamp on the series and it shows.

This is Halo at its core, the game you’ve always loved, but with some serious changes that go down well. A more fluid movement system with boost jumps as part of your standard load-out as well as a clamber ability, a whole new large game mode with vehicles and a REQ system. A classic Halo storyline – although a bit disjointed in places – powered along by a brilliant score.

I’ve always felt that Halo bridged the gap between old school first-person shooters like Doom and contemporary ones like Battlefield. The bright colours, timed power weapons and overshields make it feel much less of a ‘realistic’ shooter than the likes of Battlefield and even CoD. That’s not to say it isn’t believable, I straight up feel like a super soldier in a suit bossing around slaying, but the feel of arena is ‘war-games’ not just war. Again, a strong fan base will mean lots of people have already got this one, but if you haven’t it should be a serious contender for your stocking this year.

Halo 5 Warzone

Star Wars Battlefront

Well, Hell! If you ever really wanted to be in the Star Wars films this is your best chance – short of getting a role in the next movie. The sounds and sights are spot on with this latest Battlefront title. I played this with my dad and he genuinely thought he was watching a trailer for the new movie. OK, he’s old, but the point remains the same: the graphics are siiiiick! It is truly beautiful; I was reduced to a gibbering state of awe as I couldn’t handle the Star Warsness of it.

It’s basically a Battlefield game in feel and game style but with a Star Wars skin. The people at Dice have gone to great pains to tell us that is not the case, but come on guys, It is, isn’t it. This isn’t a bad thing as such; this is full on multiplayer grandness. Big lobbies lead to big games filled with all the lightsaber swinging, X-wing dog fighting and rebel scum squishing/empire destroying – depending on your perspective – that you could possibly want. If you like Star Wars and you like videogames then you’re going to have a good time.

As a reminder though, there’s no single player story. There is a Wave mode in which you face increasingly difficult AI enemies but this is otherwise entirely focused on multiplayer. Despite this however, this is a must for the true Star Wars fan, and comes strongly recommend for everyone.

Star Wars Battlefront Gunplay

Fallout 4

“Finally!” I hear you cry “a game that isn’t centred around online multiplayer.” Yep, and this is maybe the best single player experience currently out there, by a country mile in fact. A friend of mine got this on release day, his girlfriend has left him and he lost his job. But he’s over 50% completed and that’s all that matters, at least that’s what he mumbles with vacant awareness that only comes from the truly addict…dedicated.

Bethesda have done it again, despite some bugs that crop up – pretty expected from a massive open world these days – the game is wonderful. It plays very well, has a good combat system, and has some extreme depth to, well, everything. Skill trees, weapons, characters, and a build your own settlement; this game provides ample content for you to delve into. Think Skyrim with guns and set in a messed up, mutated future.

Whilst taking up days of your life, the solo play means you can jump in and out of it at leisure without feeling like you’ve been left behind. It has good graphics – not incredible though – given some room due to the vast open world it’s running as backdrop, it’s seriously immersive with its story and has lots of little things to keep you entertained, such as funny characters, side quest, interesting weapons, crazy mutants. This is another must have entry in the series.

Fallout 4 gunplay

Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain

Although out since September I’m still giving this an honourable mention as it’s just so friggin’ good! This is gaming done right. I’ve never really played the MGS series, but got tempted in when Ground Zeroes came out. I played it through again and again for weeks, now the Phantom Pain is out and I’m putting it up with some of the best open-world games I’ve played. The maps are very large and can be explored freely with the missions taking place within confined areas in the maps. The story is nuts, plain old out there crazy storytelling, which is great and everything I’d expect for the next edition in a series infamous for its convoluted plots.

If you played the Splinter Cell games you’ll get along with this. It’s ultimate stealth operations and you really do have a huge amount of options for how to do 99% of the missions. Konami said ‘the most strategically unparalleled game every created’ and I think they might be right. Fantastic graphics, good control system and menu access, and an abundance of weapons/equipment to choose from brings the open-world experience to life. I have spent hours on his game and will spend hours more. There’s also the addition of a multiplayer mode that, whilst quite different to a classic head to head, is also very good fun.

MGSV Gunplay

There you go, five of the top gunplay games out right now that you can get for Christmas. Slip on your slippers, grab your energy drink of choice and settle down. The weather is crap, perfect for melting into your seat for a few weeks.

Metal Gear Online launches today

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Have you been enjoying the campaign in Konami’s excellent Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain? Have you been hankering after something a little more social though? Today, Konami launches Metal Gear Online, to allow you to do just that.

Metal Gear Online is the dedicated, squad-based multiplayer component of The Phantom Pain and after a short update, should be available to Xbox One and Xbox 360 players from today.

This new option is visible from the main game’s menu, allowing users to experience multiplayer action from within the game’s stunning open world locations. Initially included in the PS3’s MGS IV: Guns of the Patriots, this has been redesigned with the familiar aesthetic styling of the acclaimed series.

The online element will feature Tactical Team Operations and a class system that more uniquely defines the strengths and abilities of player characters on the battlefield.

As if that wasn’t good news enough, all Collector’s Edition additional content can now be redeemed. This means you could now get your itchy trigger-fingers on the gold WU S Pistol and AM MRS-4, an XP Boost and a Metal Gear Rex helmet.

Day One Edition owners can also grab their redeemable XP Boost.

Win-win.

Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain review

Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain is excellent. It’s hugely ambitious with sky high expectations from it ravenous fan base, and yet it still manages to surprise, even astound us with its excellence. However, this is not the Metal Gear Solid experience you were necessarily expecting.

Metal Gear Solid V kicks off after the events of the prequel Metal Gear Solid V: Ground Zeroes title. Protagonist, Big boss, has been in a coma for nine years following the attack on Mother Base at the end of Ground Zeroes, with the world largely believing he’s dead. Once you come to, the adversarial private military force XOF quickly try to kill you, finishing the job they started back in Ground Zeroes, and after an exhilarating escape from a hospital in Greece, begins the journey of revenge for Big Boss and his allies.

The first hour is utterly superb, hitting a sense of exhilaration seldom seen in the medium, let alone the stealth genre. It’s a brilliant way to kick off the story, bringing the classic, comic-book, over-the-top villains and action to centre stage in much the same vein as previous entries in the series. However, after this intense sequence the tone shifts dramatically to a more subtle and serious one. It can’t help but feel incongruous. However, after mere minutes in the first open-world location, Afghanistan, new qualities come to light.

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This is a very different Metal Gear Solid, the cut scenes are typically short, the dialogue snappy, the sense of freedom immense. Instead, actions speak louder than words, and you’re not simply watching a tale and interacting with it loosely, you too are put through your paces.

The Phantom Pain is expertly crafted to frustrate, bewilder and delight you in highly precise manners, with the intension to make you feel like you’ve experienced similar emotions and struggles to Big Boss, and it achieves this brilliantly. Revenge seems so simple to begin with but becomes more complex as you chase it. Much in the same way your rebuilt Mother Base starts as a small installation and grows to include hundreds of staff that support you on the battlefield in myriad of ways. Yet this complexity is handled terrifically so not to overwhelm you, drip feeding you more options as the hours pass to gradually teach you the ropes and  as you gradually change your driving focus from revenge to control.

Of course, as series fans will know, Big Boss is the central villain of the franchise, here we see how that transition from hero to villain occurs, or more accurately, how the myth of Big Boss relates to the man. This is an important tale in the overarching mythos of the series, and its subtle telling is all the more powerful for its results.

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This may, however, initially disappoint series veterans. This isn’t the same exposition heavy Metal Gear storytelling from the earlier titles. This feels far more enclosed and isolated, ideal for newcomers, meanwhile the nuances for fans are largely tucked away in audio cassettes.

The battlefield will also feel strange to series veterans. Ground Zeroes laid the ground work in teaching you the mechanics but the open-world locations of Afghanistan and Africa offer such immense freedom that it’s hard to comprehend. You can approach a mission objective however you see fit, whether that’s sneaking in and remaining completely unseen, knocking out guards with tranquiliser darts and chokeholds, or go in noisy with means to slaughter everyone, it’s completely up to you. However, it’s even more freeing that that. You can call in support helicopters to bomb locations or cover you, or have new equipment dropped into the area of operation for you to use. Your cassette player can even be used to fool guards into thinking you’ve been killed if you find a tape of a guard saying “enemy eliminated”, or amusingly, if you find a tape of someone being violently ill you can hide in a toilet and keep guards away from the area by playing that. The options are innumerable, and it’s wonderfully compelling figuring out what you can do and then deciding what you want to do when approaching a new challenge.

Moreover, missions often change midway through, either because you’ve gathered intel and are moving on to the next objective naturally, or because you messed up and things got out of hand, requiring new equipment and tactics. Additionally, mission often have side objectives you’re unaware of until you discover them, such as prisoners you can extract. Furthermore, you’re always looking to expand the abilities of Mother Base, so by using the Fulton Recovery System you can extract enemy soldiers to turn to your side, as well as equipment such as static machine guns, mortars, even vehicles and crates of resources – once you have the more advanced Fulton upgrades. The missions are so much more complex and interesting that they may first seem.

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This is further enhanced with the buddy system, which lets you bring a horse, dog, personal metal gear walker, or Quiet the peculiar and deadly female sniper. Each can support you in different ways and help with different playstyles. The walker is excellent at making you a one man army; when equipped with a shield on your back and a Gatling gun on the front you’re near unstoppable. Meanwhile, D-Dog is perfect from distracting enemies if stealth is more your style.

Furthermore, you can research and build new equipment and weapons at Mother Base and these enhance you option even more, allowing you to equip deadly new tools and items to yourself and your buddies to help get the job done. Moreover, as you grow Mother Base the more it can support you, with one aspect of that being combat teams you can send out on missions. Some of these mission affect the battlefield, such as disrupting the supply of weapons and equipment to enemy soldiers, which is critically important as the enemies adapt to your tactics.

As you come across enemies they gradually learn new tactics to counter your own. If you’re a fan of headshots then prepare for enemy soldiers to start wearing helmets. Having your combat teams disrupt the supply of helmets can be a godsend in the trickier missions, and boy do they get tricky. As the story progresses the enemies become more dangerous, with new weapons, equipment, larger numbers, higher vigilance and an overall superb AI. They quickly react to your presence, calling in reinforcement, going on patrol in pairs or more, and using highly aggressive tactics if they spot you. Moreover, from Act 2 some mission enhance the difficult by restricting equipment or forcing you to complete them completely undetected, and whilst this feels like padding when you first come by them, it becomes apparent how well they fit in with the overall story and theme in the end.

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Indeed you can approach a mission from so many different angles that if you do have to replay them, either due to continued deaths or you want to increase your score for that mission, then there are many other approaches you can attempt. As such, frustration rarely rears its head, albeit for a couple of story missions that have you facing off against powerful bosses or overwhelming odds.

In addition to the 40 plus hours of story missions and 150 optional side ops, a multiplayer component is present to tide you over until Metal Gear Solid Online launches in early October. You can create a Forward Operating Base and manage it much like you do Mother Base. However, your FOB can be attacked by other players who can infiltrate and steal resources by using the Fulton Recovery System. When it occurs whilst you’re online you’ll get the option to stop them head on yourself, otherwise it’s down to the AI and the security forces and equipment you’ve developed for them. Meanwhile, you can also attack other player’s FOBs and try and steal their personnel and resources for yourself. It’s a fun aside that can get highly competitive.

Indeed Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain is an exceptional game. It’s mechanically superb, allowing you to take a stealth or action approach with fluidity, its open-world design is unmatched in the action and/or stealth genre, offering extreme freedom that offers oodles of replayability, and the story is intriguing, profound and subtly spun with a focus on action rather than words. Its different approach to the Metal Gear Solid formula may initially disappoint series fans but this is, by far, the most intuitive version for newcomers and an incredible finale from creator Hideo Kojima.

Thanks to Xbox and Konami for their support 

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Metal Gear Solid Online locked and loaded for October 6

The full multiplayer offering for Metal Gear Solid V The Phantom Pain is locked and loaded for release on October 6. Metal Gear Online features a variety of classes, mission types, abilities and equipment, and will be available for free for all MGSV The Phantom Pain owners.

If you’ve been enjoying the Phantom Pain, then MGO will be right up your street – pitched somewhere between Splinter Cell and Rainbow Six’s Terrorist modes – the main difference being that you fight against an opposing team of players rather than AI.

The buddy link is a particularly interesting dynamic – you can share combat information with another member of your team – helpful if you need backup from a sniper as you stake out an enemy position.

The trailer below runs through MGO’s Bounty Hunter mode and takes a quick look at each of the classes.

TiX Podcast: #Neg #Greale

Welcome to the This is Xbox Podcast.

Join Greg Giddens and Neale Jarrett in the latest TiX Podcast – episode 13 #Neg # Greale – where the duo discuss the Black Ops 3 Beta, Metal Gear Solid V Ground Zeroes and The Phantom Pain, as well as Gears of War Ultimate Edition. The pair then take a lightning quick look at some recent news. But of course, the main attraction is the usual banter and jokes.

https://soundcloud.com/thisisxboxpodcast/tix-podcast-neg-greale

If you want to send us a question or topic for the topic discussion section, or simply contact us, then shoot over an email to: podcast@thisisxbox.com

You can also follow the hosts on Twitter: @GregGiddens and @BaronVonPleb

You can also find us on iTunes, Stitcher and SoundCloud.

If you like the show and want to support it, please check out our Patreon page.

The awesome music in this episode was provided by Bangmaid and produced by James Gill. (https://www.mixcloud.com/bangmaid/)