Tag Archives: No Man’s Sky

No Man’s Sky is headed to Xbox

No Man’s Sky is the next title to make the jump onto Xbox One. Previously only available on PlayStation, Hello Games have plodded through update after update of its space exploration game, No Man’s Sky and the next one is going to be a big one, and one that sees the game launch onto Xbox One.

“We are calling this No Man’s Sky Next because it is an important next step in a journey for No Man’s Sky, for Hello Games and for our devoted community.” said Sean Murray, founder at Hello Games. “Each update for No Man’s Sky has been more successful than the last; this was especially true of our last update Atlas Rises. It emboldens the team to push ourselves further. This journey is far from over, and it’s exciting to be working again on something you know will surprise people.”

Releasing later this year, the Xbox One version will include all previously released content. First Crash Bandicoot, then Hellblade and now, No Man’s Sky – what will jump next onto Xbox?

Morphite review

It’s No ‘No Man’s Sky’, but it doesn’t need to be.

Morphite is Blowfish Studios’ mobile-come-console exploration game, which puts you in the shoes of Myrah, a girl who explores the galaxy, against her mentor’s wishes, in search of the titular Morphite; an item with immense power, both creative and destructive. It also has links to Myrah’s past. The expositional mouthpiece is Kitcat, a robotic cat. Kitcat is the show stealer, no doubts.

In Morphite you’ll explore dozens of planets, with each acting like a small Metroidvania environment in which you’ll shoot monsters and solve puzzles to obtain key items and progress the story. As you play, you’ll discover new ways to upgrade both Myrah and her ship – which criminally doesn’t have a name. Upgrading is done mainly via vendors and space stations. Upgrading your armour is a must, for a while at least, as it grants access to new planets; those that are too hot or cold are restricted at first. Upgrades require currency, these chunks are obtained via looting chests, killing monsters and destroying other objects on the surfaces of the worlds you explore. The chunks are complimented with resources which are obtained by picking harvesting mineral nodes found scattered around the various landscapes on the numerous planets you’ll find yourself visiting.

You have a fair few gadgets at your disposal, from grenades to a robo-pet. These tools will allow you to approach each location with a degree of freedom; you can choose to just go in phasers-a-blazing, killing any wildlife in your way, or you could – if you upgraded your shields and/or scanner – tank the damage from hostile animals and scan them for valuable data. This data can then be sold to upgrade your items further.

This circular approach sums up Morphite nicely, as, like a circle, Morphite doesn’t stray from the formula it establishes very early on. This isn’t a necessarily bad thing, as we have to remember that Blowfish made Morphite as a mobile title first, with console following.

As I stated at the beginning – It’s No No Man’s Sky, but it doesn’t need to be.

Thanks to Xbox and Crescent Moon Games for supporting TiX

Is No Man’s Sky coming to Xbox One?

Data-mined files and an interview with Hello Games head, Sean Murray, have revealed evidence that No Man’s Sky might be coming to Xbox One after all.

NeoGAF user, Dragonbain, posted screenshots and info from his data-mine of the Steam version of No Man’s Sky. It’s obviously full of potential spoilers, so if you check out the post then be warned, but also within the files are some interesting hints at an Xbox One version of the game.

The game’s Havok license – Havok being an industry physics engine that No Man’s Sky uses – includes licenses for PC, PS4 and Xbox One.

No Man's Sky Xbox News

Additionally, in an interview with the Daily Star, Sean Murray says some interesting things regarding the question of PS4 exclusivity:

The Daily Star said:

So when we spoke to Hello Games Sean Murray, the man responsible for creating No Man’s Sky, we asked him and received a rather coy response for what we assumed was a very straightforward question.

In response Murray told us he wasn’t sure what he was “actually allowed to say” at the time, noting that he needed to be “very specific with my words”.

Before going any further though, Sony’s rep stepped in to move the interview along, explaining that at this time there was nothing more to add.

A Havok license typically costs around $25,000, so licensing it for a platform you don’t intend to release on seems unlikely. Although, if Sony jumped in with an offer for exclusivity after the license was already bought by Hello Games, this could of been factored into the payment they received from Sony.

Meanwhile, Sony publish the physical release of No Man’s Sky, but the digital release is self published by Hello Games, another hint that exclusivity may have a digital loophole for a timed exclusive.

However, despite this building evidence there’s still doubts. The data-mined files also contain PS3 and Xbox 360 related data, and the chances of No Man’s Sky hitting those console is slim-to-none.

In the end these files could all be leftover legacy files from when No Man’s Sky was in early development, but here’s hoping we see the title hit Xbox One in the near future.