Tag Archives: Prey

Prey: Mooncrash review

Prey: Mooncrash is a very clever and highly enjoyable melding of first-person shooting and exploration with Rogue-like death and replay. It manages to create an entirely fresh experience in the Prey universe. Moreover, it’s fantastically compelling.

You are tasked with entering a simulation and reliving the desperate escape of five individuals that are trapped on the lunar base with Typhon enemies. Much like the core game, the Typhon come in a variety of forms, including the Mimics which morph into different objects to deceive and scare the hell out of you, and bi-pedal forms known as Phantoms. Some additional, new forms are also present in Mooncrash, including a tentacle spewing egg and a terrifically named ‘moon shark’. Dealing with these enemies, either through combat with whatever weaponry you manage to find – melee and projectile – or through environmental hazard manipulation, sneaking, or your very own Typhon abilities and skills provided by implants, is the order of the day.

Indeed, there’s a wealth of options as to how you choose to engage, or avoid, conflict, and the same can be said for progressing through the moon base. Multiple paths are available with different obstacles to traverse, whether these are locked doors requiring pass cards, hacking skills, passwords gained by reading notes and emails or the computer terminals, let alone the environmental hazards and enemies. However, a big change with Mooncrash over the core game are the five characters you control.

To begin with you’re limited to a single character, but as you play his unique escape attempt you gradually unlock the additional characters. This can occur when you discover their corpse for the first time, or by achieving the specific story objective for a character. These objectives are present for each character and revolves around one of the five available escape methods, such as using the escape pod, flying out on a shuttle, etc. Meanwhile, additional objectives are also available for each character, should you feel the need to put yourself in great danger and uncover more of the plot.

With the Rogue-like addition of skills carrying over even after death, and the environment maintaining a persistent state for each cycle, after a dozen or so attempts you’ll have the whole cast ready to go, allowing you to use the abilities of different characters to help pave the way for the others. The ultimate goal is the have a perfect run; where all five characters manage to escape during a single, unbroken cycle. However, achieving this is anything but simple.

Determining which characters can do what is largely a case of trial and error and is discovered simply by using them. However, understanding the base layout and what activates what, takes some exploration, and the more you explore the more dangerous it becomes. This isn’t only because of the random spawning of enemies for each cycle but also because of an imposed time limit. The simulation technology you’re using is unstable, and the longer you remain in it, the more unstable it becomes. This instability is measured in levels, and as each level is reached, new enemies spawn and become more aggressive. It’s a clever mechanic that adds urgency and threat with an effective randomness; it’s Rogue-like at its best.

And indeed, it’s these Rogue-like elements that make this such an interesting experience. Items and enemies surprise you with different spawn locations each cycle, the environment also changes throwing unforeseeable obstacles at you, all the while your cast of characters are gradually getting stronger, your knowledge of the base is increasing, and those five escape plans and their order begin to reveal themselves. Pair this with Prey’s environmental storytelling, intense combat and terrifying enemies, and you’ve got a tremendously unique and engaging package.

Prey’s core mechanics of exploration, limited ammo and health, and horror would make figuring out how to achieve each characters’ escape frustrating due to the amount of times it causes your demise, but due to the Rogue-like qualities of skill retention and a semi-persistent environment, it makes this a unique and entertaining experience that’s hard to put down.

Thanks to Bethesda for supporting TiX

Prey now available as a trial on Xbox One

When it was launched earlier this year, Prey from Bethesda was available as a demo on Xbox One. This has now moved to being a trial which means anyone who wants to test out Prey ahead of a purchase can retain their progress along with any achievements earned during the trial.

In Prey, you awaken aboard Talos I, a space station orbiting the moon in the year 2032. You are the key subject of an experiment meant to alter humanity forever – but things have gone terribly wrong. The space station has been overrun by hostile aliens and you are now being hunted. As you dig into the dark secrets of Talos I and your own past, you must survive using the tools found on the station, your wits, weapons, and mind-bending abilities

Prey review

Prey successfully melds science fiction and horror in a more contemporary and grounded setting that the original title from 2006. It therefore doesn’t feel at all related to its predecessor, posing question as to why it needed to use the name ‘Prey’. However, while its roots are muddy, the title that’s grown from them is wonderfully intense and intriguing, providing an experience that’s a bit familiar in places yet superbly polished.

The likeness to titles such as System Shock and Bioshock is hard to deny, with ‘mystery’ being its primary draw. You play as either a female of male Morgan Yu, waking up in your apartment and given the objective of heading to work. However, the reality of Yu’s situation is quickly challenged as something goes wrong behind the scenes, revealing Yu’s place of work to in fact be a space station in orbit around Earth, and Yu’s memory erased as an emergency protocol. Worse still, the station is infested by an alien organism known as Typhon, capable of shifting their appearance to look like everyday objects as well as sucking the life out of all living things. It’s a threat that must not be allowed to reach Earth, and despite your fractured memories, it’s up to you to figure out precisely what’s going on within the station and destroy the Typhon.

Your main objectives lead you through a well-paced and interesting story of discovery but the station is littered with side quests to further the lore. You’re free to switch between these objectives at will, with the space station open for you to explore, assuming you have the card keys, weapons and abilities to surpass the obstacles. It’s a metrovania style of free-roaming exploration that helps the environment feel more realistic and works to help satisfy your intrigue if the greater lore should grip you. Moreover, there are often multiple ways for you to conquer the obstacles in your way, whether that’s exploring and finding key cards to open otherwise locked doors, or using the neat collection of weapons to make a route – such as the Glu gun that creates clumps of solid matter to temporarily freeze enemies in place or create makeshift stairs to clamber on – or even using your abilities to hack and repair security nodes. It’s wonderfully open.

However, as much as exploration is encouraged by objectives, and required to progress, there’s an terrifically eerie personality to the station that does a tremendous job of putting you off. It’s a rare occasion of an environment looking lived in and mostly brightly lit, but the powerful sense of loneliness and the threat the Typhoon poses makes entering every room intense and frightening.

The spider-like Typhon, Mimics, can shifting into everyday objectives, fooling you into a false sense of security where a room looks harmless when in fact you’re surrounded. As you approach objects that are in fact Mimics, they shift back to their alien form and spring towards you. It makes you paranoid and puts you on edge, and with some superb scripted events in the early stages of the game, you’re quickly introduced to just how devious this enemy can be.

However, Yu does have a few tricks up his/her sleeve. The experiments you were a part of have granted you abilities which can be upgraded and expanded on through a skill tree. Additionally, new technical skills, health and stamina stats, and multiple other upgrades can be purchased and augmented with collectables. Eventually you can become a force to be reckoned with, although the further you commit to certain abilities the more you threaten your own humanity as the story progresses. It’s an interesting exploration of consequences that makes your play through a little more personal.

The use of limited stamina and inventory space adds a pleasant slice of survival horror to proceedings, enhanced considerably by the fast shifting and attacking of the Typhon as well as the wonderful use of music to intensify encounters. Running out of stamina and being unable to deal damage to the alien menace while being attacked does tread a thin line between frustrating and enhancing the horror. Meanwhile, the humanoid Typhon and human enemies require different tactics to overcome. It results in a clever set of combat encounters that force you to use a variety of different weapons and strategies to deal with the differing types and differing numbers you encounter.

A crafting feature allows you to create ammo, health and other items from machines strewn around the station. These machines use scrap and items you find, breaks them down into compound parts which can then be used to create whatever you please, assuming you have the blueprints. It means ammo and health are scarce, and improvising is encouraged. Environmental hazards can be used in combat to help even the odds, switching to different weapons is often necessary, and food items can be picked up and consumed to regain a little health and stamina. Mostly, this encourages you to avoid combat and run, enhancing the horror aspect to good effect.

Indeed, Prey does a great job delivering a smart FPS, survival horror hybrid with an intriguing setting and story. There’s some unfortunate technical limitations that can lead to some occasional frame rate issues and some long loading times between areas, but the journey of discovery and combat against the Typhon aliens aboard the space station is a highly satisfying, intense and rewarding experience. It’s a reboot that strays considerable from the original vision but successfully builds something new from the ashes of the Prey IP.

Thanks to Xbox and Bethesda for supporting TiX

Bethesda tease their E3 showcase with an image

Much like last year, Bethesda have gone and released a tantalising image to tease their E3 showcase this year.

The image tells us it’ll al kick off on June 11 at 1830 PT (0230 June 12 for us Brits), but otherwise the image doesn’t offer many hints. We see Fallout, Elder Scrolls, Prey, Quake, Doom and Dishonored amongst the cute art but nothing else. Oh well, we’ll have to wait for the inevitable E3 leaks then stay up way past our bed times to confirm it all when E3 comes around.

Prey Opening Hour trailer released

The highly anticipated reboot of Prey is due out in a mere few days, May 5, and to whet your appetite that little bit more is a new trailer.

The trailer promotes the Opening Hour demo, available now on Xbox One. This will allow you to check out the first hour (or more, depending on how you play) of Morgan Yu’s first day on the job. Before Prey’s May 5 release, kick off your journey through Talos I and fight the alien invasion that’s threatening all of humanity.

Take a Guided Tour of Talos I in new Prey Video

Join us on a Guided Tour of Talos I in the latest teaser video for Prey.

The game isn’t only about fighting the invasion or an epic journey to figure out who you are and how you’ll save humanity from the Typhon threat – it’s also about the space station itself. Talos I is full of secrets to discover and poses a unique threat all by itself. Take a tour of Talos I and get an inside look at the space station in the video below.

As Morgan Yu, you’ll get to move freely throughout Talos I, and even return to previously explored areas to find big changes depending on how the story unfolds – or what actions the you’ve taken. You will also be able to go outside of the space station and fly around in zero gravity, using the exterior to navigate to a different area or to find additional secrets hidden outside Talos I.

Prey is set for release on May 5.

In Prey, you’ll be ‘Playing with Powers’

With Prey only a few weeks away you’ll be seeing plenty more of the games features. With the Typhoo aliens looking to destroy mankind you’ll need more than just your wits to take them on. Your only hope is Morgan Yu who has the option of “installing” a wide range of human and alien abilities.

You can see some of these in the trailer below as well as exclusive insights from the team at Arkane Studios.

Which route will you take? Keep an eye out for another trailer tomorrow which will feature fresh insight into Prey’s mind-altering Neruomod Division, and for more examples of how you can combine weapons and powers

Prey weapons and combo details released

With it’s May release date firmly set, more details are being released showing what we can expect from Prey. The 2017 version of Prey has been described as not being a remake or a sequel but a complete reimagining of the original. The video below gives us details of the weapons that we will be using to aid our battle against the alien enemy. As mankind’s last hope aboard the spaceship Talos you are going to need some pretty kick ass kit, and from watching this you are not short of exactly that.

More videos have been set for release so keep your eye’s on TiX for more news. Set to launch worldwide on Friday, May 5, 2017 on Xbox One,  Prey is the highly-anticipated first-person sci-fi action game from Arkane Studios – creators of the award-winning Dishonored series which includes the 2012 ‘Game of the Year’ and the critically-acclaimed follow-up, Dishonored 2.

Time to Prey

Bethesda Softworks have today announced that the Xbox One re-imagining of Prey will be released this May. From the same studio that brought us Dishonoured and Dishonoured 2, Arkane Studios, have created what is set out to be one of the most anticipated games of 2017.

The story starts when you wake up on a massive space station called Talos somewhere is the future. You find yourself the key to some experiments that have gone horribly wrong, like they do. Your job is to survive the alien onslaught using your weapons and bind bending abilities. One if which is the ability to change into an inanimate object.

Fans who pre-order Prey will receive the exclusive Cosmonaut Shotgun Pack. The pre-order bonus consists of Morgan Yu’s family heirloom Margrave shotgun and tools to fight threats aboard Talos I including: three Neuromods players can spend to acquire new abilities, two Medkits, a Fabrication plan to create the Shotgun and Ammo, a starter kit for building tools and weapons, and a unique upgrade to help players preserve their limited resources.

Prey will be released on Xbox One on the 5th of May 2017.

New Prey gameplay trailer released

Bethesda and Arkane Studios have released an extended gameplay walkthrough for Prey, the first-person sci-fi action game that blends simulation and narration, dropping you into a carefully crafted world, then setting you free to play as you want.

You can check out the new walkthough video with narration from Creative Director, Raphael Colantonio and Lead Designer, Ricardo Bare below:

Prey is set release some time in 2017.