Tag Archives: tower defence

Let Them Come review

There’s a scene in Aliens where the marines setup automatic turrets to shoot the approaching horde of aliens. In Let Them Come you essentially recreate that scene but as a gunner controlling a turret. It’s intense, a little scare despite the pixel art aesthetic, fun and challenging. It’s so very similar to that scene from Aliens, yet to my knowledge, this is the first time it’s been translated to a tower defence game, and it works marvellously.

It’s so very simple. A text introduction paints the picture of a lone soldier needing to setup his turret at different locations to figure out the story behind this alien infestation. It’s then a matter of you earning credits by shooting the aliens, buying upgrades for your character and the turret, then conquering multiple waves of aliens, defeating a boss, and moving on to the next location.

Pixel art conveys the action and gore. The narrow corridors with subtle animations in the background, foreground and the sides bringing each scene to life. Silky smooth animations for your character’s movement as well as that of the many different alien species. It looks fantastic. In fact this art style is miraculous, and not just here but practically everywhere I see it. How these pixel artists capture a person, an alien, a location so beautifully and in such detail while shaping it in pixels is miraculous. Here it also works to add a level of nostalgia to the title, to manage your expectations for a simple game of tower defence. Indeed, it wouldn’t have been out of place as an official Aliens game from 1986, if it wasn’t for the exceptionally smooth frame rate, crisp well-defined pixels and copious amounts of alien hostiles and bullets filling the corridor that only modern system can truly handle at this level of quality.

There’s more to it than simply letting loose with your turret against the waves of aliens, though, and soon you’re contemplating precisely what you need to purchase between waves to best fight the horde; what the best tools are for this violent but necessary job of survival. You can only hold limited ammo types and equipment, and choosing the right combination becomes more and more critical as the waves progress.

Four slots can be filled with passive upgrades, these being buffs to health, or armour against projectiles, cooling vents for the turret, and several more which affect your character’s ability to fight off the waves. Meanwhile, two slots are available for personal equipment, these consisting of melee weapons, grenades and other useful offensive of defensive items. Moreover, there’s a wide selection of different types of grenades that perform better against different species or quantities of aliens. Finally, there’s the two slots for ammo type for the turret, these being the standard ammo, of which you have an infinite amount, and the special ammo types, that run the gamut much like the grenades do. Bullets for the special ammo types need to be bought and used wisely to deal with waves. Indeed, there are many factors to consider when it comes to purchasing these weapons and equipment that will affect your survival rate.

As you defeat waves and progress, more is revealed. Boss creatures test your ability to adapt at the end of each location, providing a stiff challenge that requires you to equip yourself smartly. Meanwhile, power-ups are earned that can provide some much needed boosts to ammo, health, score, or even enhances you and your firepower temporarily. Fortunately, defeat isn’t the end, you are free to restart the wave having kept any credits earned so to spend them more wisely and maybe prevail next time. Additionally, much of the purchasable equipment can be upgraded once you’ve moved to a new location, always giving you something to spend your hard earned credits on, and soon proving crucial to keeping you alive as larger waves attack and new alien species throw something unexpected at you. Let Them Comes certainly keeps you on your toes.

Despite the challenge, however, it doesn’t take long to reach the end, and for some the frustration of overcoming the challenge is going to be too much. Afterwards you can play through again at different difficulty levels, as well as compete for high scores, but your mileage will vary depending on your patients and love of the genre and art style. Although, the time you do spend with this exhilarating and delightful tower defence title is certainly well wasted.

Thanks to Xbox and Versus Evil for supporting TiX

Kingdom: New Lands review

Kingdom: New Lands is purposely obtuse, providing a mere slither of context in the beginning and nothing more. As such, it can get frustrating figuring out what you need to do and how to go about doing it. Moreover, this often turns into a trial and error learning curve, inevitably ending in your character’s death. However, this is part of Kingdom: New Land’s narrative: the struggle to keep the crown and conquer each island.

It’s a compelling experience; however many times you die you’ll find yourself quickly yearning to try again, fresh with the knowledge you gleaned from your last attempt. A single mistake, such as building the wrong kind of unit or expanding your kingdom too early, can be extremely difficult and often impossible to come back from, but there’s joy in the discovery and challenge that keeps you playing. Despite the lack of clarity and punishing difficulty, Kingdom: New Lands is also hugely satisfying and fun.

You are tasked, as the new king or queen, in building a kingdom. On each of the islands of the world you must build a settlement, repair your ship, then sail to another land to do it all over again. It’s a cross between a management title and a tower defence game; you recruit citizens to your settlement by giving nomads a gold coin, then you can turn them into engineers to build things, archers to shoot things, farmers to farm things, or knights to lead armies of archers against the things that come out at night. Once the sun has set you’ll be beset by demons, coming from a portal – or set of portals – deep in the forest. These foal things mean to take gold from your citizens, as well as their weapons and tools, and most importantly your crown. It’s imperative that you defend against these raids whilst you complete repairs to your ship.

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Turning your citizens into useful members of your kingdom requires you to purchase their tools or weapons. In the early game this is limited to engineers and archers, with you buying hammers and bows respectively, however, as the game progresses, farmers require scythes and knights require shields. Your settlement adds these new features and stalls as your upgrade the centre, and things get expensive fast. Fortunately, your archers can hunt rabbits and deer to provide cash, a trader visits town daily and generates more gold, and farmers bring in a healthy income after a few days of tending to their crops. Your engineers can get you a little bit of extra spending money from cutting down trees, and deep in the forest lies a couple of chests full of gold, but managing your income and your settlement’s growth is a tricky challenge.

The Nomads for recruiting into your kingdom are found in campsites in the forest. Cut down the trees surrounding them and that campsite disappears. The same goes for the traders hut. And whilst the raiding demons never kill your people, when they do attack them they strip them of their gold, turning them back into nomads. Furthermore, upgrading your settlement costs a pretty penny, as do the walls and archer towers needed to defend your settlement. Controlling your expenditure whilst maintaining a well defended and prosperous settlement proves very difficult.

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With every passing night, the raiding demons become more numerous and introduce variants, putting a strain on your defences, so ensuring you upgrade your defences swiftly is important. However, in order to efficiently and effectively upgrade and manage your settlement you need to understand the layout of the island you’re on, encouraging you to explore from end to end. Here is where Kingdom: New Lands aesthetic really impresses.

The whole game is on a 2D plain, with tremendously detailed and animated pixel art bringing the people of your kingdom and you, upon your trusty steed, to life. What starts off as a set of lush green forests and plains becomes dull and lifeless in autumn, snow covered in winter, before being reborn in spring and back to glory in summer. It’s wonderfully complex and beautiful. Furthermore, the canopy of trees in the forest blocks the light from the sun and forces you to light a torch as you explore. The torches are once again branded at night by characters and buildings. Meanwhile, the action from the middle of the screen is superbly reflected in the flowing water of the bottom third of the screen. It’s a remarkably well-designed and thought-out, showing a level of visual complexity and beauty seldom seen in pixel art. It’s outstanding.

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Despite the stiff challenge, Kingdom: New Lands can easily get its hooks into you, and this is largely because the challenge is fair. The procedural generation is limited to certain features to prevent unwinnable scenarios, and once you crack the mechanics, it’s a matter of planning the most efficient repair of your ship and/or defence of your settlement to claim victory. However, The AI can occasionally make things a little more difficult than they should be. Even when the demons only attack from one side, your forces will split themselves to defend each side of your settlement evenly. Moreover, occasionally a citizen will run off into the wild for no reason at all, only to return a little while later – assuming they aren’t attacked – empty handed and looking foolish. Additionally, archers sometimes won’t mount empty defence towers, hurting your defensive strategy somewhat, and your engineers have a nasty habit of wandering outside your walls and getting ganked by demons.

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Indeed, Kingdom: New Lands is a challenging game that withholds the information you need to survive and prosper, forcing you to explore and experiment to figure it all out. And as frustrating as this can be, it’s also a big part of the fun and works to keep you engaged, and the satisfaction you receive for conquering one of the six islands is rewarding enough to keep you coming back for more time and time again.

Thanks to Xbox and The Fun Pimps and Iron Galaxy for supporting TiX

Battleborn review

Part MOBA, part FPS, Part RPG; Battleborn certainly throws a lot of mechanics into its frantic action, drenched in humour and cartoon style. It’s a mixture that doesn’t quite come together in the end but the striking aesthetic and those few moments of solid cohesion are thoroughly impressive enough to make up for the shortcomings.

If you’re at all familiar with the Borderlands series, then you’ll feel very much at home with Battleborn’s aesthetic and humour. The cartoon visuals are bright, over the top and splendidly detailed; meanwhile, the meme heavy humour is thick with laugh out loud moments and superbly delivered lines from its voice cast. It’s an impressive presentation, and despite the strong similarities to Borderlands, it manages to eke out an identity for itself thanks to a wide range of unique characters.

25 characters are available for you and up to four allies to choose, allowing you to form a team of superbly different individuals in your quest to save the last remaining star from being extinguished by a mysterious evil over eight missions. Each character feels entirely different to use, possessing their own strengths, weaknesses, weapon sets and abilities, allowing you to find a character that best suits your playstyle. Moreover, the character’s unique personalities provide further incentive to experiment and try them all, giving you such chooses as a towering tank of a human with a minigun, to a samurai vampire, peculiar sorcerer, Viking warrior, and a whole lot more at differing levels of strangeness. It’s a tremendously entertaining and diverse cast that’s a pleasure to see in action, using their abilities and weapons to devastate their foes in visually intense ways.

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However, all this action and the abundance of abilities certainly makes for a busy battlefield, with particle effects, colourful animations and projectiles, as well as damage numbers all filling the screen. At a bottle neck, such action can completely obscure your targets and allies, making it difficult and frustrating to deal damage effectively. This is especially evident in Battleborn’s competitive multiplayer modes.

Three competitive modes are on offer, all pitting two teams of five against each other in objective-based combat and area control. This is where Battleborn’s MOBA DNA comes out to play, with purchasable and upgradeable turrets strewn across the map, minions spawning and joining you in battle, more powerful beasts posed for recruiting for the team who gets to them first, and an emphasis on controlling the lanes of the maps to ensure your fragile minions can get to the objectives. It’s an interesting melding of FPS and MOBA that unfortunately doesn’t often work. The aforementioned visual overkill when two teams go at it compromises tactics, making targeting tricky for dealing damage or even healing team mates. Furthermore, the first-person view-point makes assessing the battlefield and its lanes difficult at a glance. It is, however, highly immersive, and if you manage to gel with your team it’s terrifically satisfying to score a victory. However, with 25 characters to choose from, finding a team that compliments each other is tricky. The characters fall in to MMO archetypes of tank, DPS, and healer, and balancing your team with at least one of each requires some pre-thought and communication that random players outside of your circle of friends will struggle to comprehend.

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In fact, balance is an issues across the board. Not only is balancing your team an important factor, but some characters feel horrendously over powered. There’s often a trick to counter a powerful character, however, with so many character options available, and with each playing so differently, finding that counter is a chore. Moreover, each characters levels up in-match and can be enhanced with new abilities and modifications along two paths, with additional odd modifiers appearing as you gain more experience, providing a great set of options for customising, as well as resetting at the end of each match so not to permanently tie you down, but also adding an extra level of complexity in devising a counter.

The experience you earn works towards unlocking lore about each character, as well as new skins and taunts. Meanwhile, missions can also provide crates of loot – or you can purchase them as micro transactions – which offer items that buff your characters. These can then be activated in-game by spending the currency of shards, making for further customisation and variety. Indeed it’s an impressive wealth of options, but ones that make the balancing issues even more evident.

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Indeed it’s the cooperative story missions that will keep you coming back, with their Titanfall-esque structuring allowing you to complete them in any order, and only offering shallow snippets of the story. The humour of NPC and your allies, along with copious amounts of characters to unlock and enhance through lore and skins, encourages replay brilliantly, as do the multiple difficult settings for those looking for more of a challenge. These missions alone can keep you entertained for 6-8 hours. Find a savvy team of players to join you in the competitive modes and you’ll find enjoyment their too, although the community appears to still be struggling with the finer tactics and strategies.

Battleborn is a crazy and humorous FPS with great RPG and tower defence elements, and some interesting but not quite cohesive MOBA elements. It taps into what made the Borderlands games great and provides focused, cooperative multiplayer scenarios based on this same quality. The competitive side of things doesn’t quite gel with the rest of the experience, but give the community a little more time to suss it out, and Gearbox a little more time to balance the characters, and that too could entrain you for hours on end.

Thanks to Xbox and 2K Games for supporting TiX

Review

Back in December we previewed the Rouge-lite, RPG, tower defence, survival game Dungeon of the Endless, and it certainly made a good impression. However, for how enjoyable, clever and compelling it was, copious amounts of bugs kept ruining the experience and causing frustration. However, three months later and Dungeon of the Endless has hit digital shelves, and wonderfully the bugs are all gone.

Dungeon of the Endless combines mechanics and themes from tower defence, RPGs, and survival games to craft an experience that challenges you tactically, encourages risk for potential reward, pits you against swarms of enemies in frantic, heart pounding combat, and even hints at an intriguing story. It’s a wonderfully varied package that makes it appealing to a large audience.

It doesn’t, however, teach you it’s mechanics very well. The tutorial is somewhat hidden away amongst in-game menus, and it’s text-based when/if you do find it. However, with a little trial and error things become clearer. Fortunately, despite this lack of introduction and a wealth of nuance, it’s all fairly intuitive.

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Having crash-landed on an alien planet and penetrating deep into a not-so-natural network of caves, you take control of a pair of survivors and must uncover the procedurally generated dungeon made up of rooms filled with mysterious architecture and technology, find the exit, grab your escape pod’s crystal and climb to the surface 12 floors up. But of course it’s not as easy as that, as each floor is also full of monsters. These beasts are discovered randomly as you unlock each door to each new section of the dungeon, and also have a chance to spawn in any discovered but unpowered rooms. In order to limit the monster spawns and protect your party of survivors and the escape pod’s crystal, you need to use your resources to power rooms and then build defences, support modules, and resource generating nodes.

As you explore each level you’ll also encounter venders selling equipment to boost your stats – such as attack, defence and HP – as well as treasure chests also housing equipment, abandoned technology that has a chance to grant you more resources, and other characters eager to join your party and escape to the surface. Indeed exploration can be a rewarding thing, however, with monsters spawning randomly each turn and the dungeon being procedurally generated, there’s always the risk of biting off more than you can chew.

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Finding other characters allows you to modify your party, adding new member until you have a full set of four and even allowing you to switch out members if you find someone more suited to help you survive and escape the dangers ahead. Meanwhile, spending resources wisely to not only defend you, your crystal and your resource nodes, but also to level up your characters, encourages even more risk as you feel compelled to gain every piece of equipment and all possible resources to better prepare you for what’s coming on the next level. It’s hugely entertaining and immersive.

Meanwhile, research crystal can also be found on each level and through them you can enhance and upgrade your defences, resource generators, support modules, and even power generators, which all help to combat the growing threat of enemies on each level and better light up the dungeon to keep you safe. And as you climb nearer the surface the enemy’s numbers increase dramatically, as do their stats, posing an even greater threat.

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It can certainly prove challenging to keep on top of all this, especially playing alone and trying to manage all four characters yourself, however, with online coop available, up to three friends can join, take control of a character or two, and aid you. This is where Dungeon of the Endless truly shines, and working together to explore each level, design defence strategies and collect resources, allows for some excellent emergent storytelling, as well as oodles of fun.

Completing a play-through takes a good three hours or so, and with the large rooster of characters available, all with their own strengths and weaknesses, there’s plenty of incentive to dive back in. Moreover, different escape pods can be chosen at the start – once they’re unlocked – which modify the experience with additional challenges, all this on top of the procedurally generated nature of the title and Dungeon of the Endless possesses strong longevity.

Indeed Dungeon of the Endless is a challenging but superbly entertaining Rouge-lite adventure. The mixture of mechanics from multiple genres works together remarkably well, and the whole experience is masterfully balanced to provide a stiff challenge but one that seldom feels unfair. Now that all the bugs from the preview version have been eradicated, Dungeon of the Endless comes highly recommended.

Thanks to Xbox and Amplitude for supporting TiX

Fortified! review

Fortified! melds 1950s sci-fi with tower defence wonderfully. Alien saucers and a plethora of robots that wouldn’t look out of place in films such as Lost in Space and War of the Worlds, march forwards towards rockets armed with nuclear warheads, as you and up to three fellow heroes protect these rockets over multiple attacking waves. Once the waves have finished the onslaught, the rocket or rockets launch and strike back at the alien invaders.

It’s a simple premise with only the mere slither of story but one that proves enjoyable and compelling thanks to it’s strong aesthetic identity and accessible mechanics. However, this is a title best enjoyed with friends, utilising each character’s unique abilities to push back the horde of aliens and robots.

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The Agent, the Spaceman, the Captain, and the Rocket Scientist are your choice of characters, with their diverse set of skills allowing them to deal with enemies in some neat ways. The Captain keeps things simple with a shotgun and machine gun, while the Spaceman has a freeze gun, the Rocket Scientist carries a high-damage grenade launcher and laser pistol, meanwhile the Agent can deploy snipers for support. Working together the four heroes pack a significant punch and can dispatch the invading menace in creatively entertaining ways. Furthermore, each character has a special move they can activate once they fill a meter, inducing temporary invulnerability as well as activating a unique ability, such as the Captain’s air strikes or the Rocket Scientist’s jetpack.

To destroy the robots and aliens it’s a matter of working together to protect the routes to the rockets – of which there can be more than one – by combating enemies directly in third person combat and by placing down weapons between waves. You can place turrets, troops, anti-air, anti-tank, artillery and more to help protect the rockets and aid you in the fight, but they cost money – that you earn by destroying foes – and you’re restricted on what you can build by a limited inventory for each stage as well as the need to upgrade to unlock better equipment.

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Each character levels up independently, and as they do you can unlock new weapons and upgrades for them to wield as well as new defence equipment. When in-game, you must choose your arsenal of weapons and defence equipment before the waves begin, adding a slight tactical consideration. Your choice is further guided by indicators of what kinds of enemies you’re going to face in the coming waves, so you’ll know whether or not anti-air, for example, is worth bringing into the fight.

It’s a good upgrade system that encourages you to grind the easier levels to better prepare yourself for the tougher ones ahead. Furthermore it encourages you to switch between characters rather than stick with just the one. Of course this does also feel a bit like padding out the experience, but fortunately it’s enjoyable enough to where it’s a forgivable design choice.

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A 12 level campaign as well as an infinite waves, endurance-style Invasion Mode are available for you to tackle either alone or with up to three friends, but with a limit on how many things you can place to help defend, as well as the aggressive attacks of the invaders. The two modes feel very similar, testing the might and cooperation of your team. But it certainly proves enjoyable. Moreover the crisp and colourful visuals with the 1950s aesthetic is eye pleasing and runs smooth throughout.

Fortified! is a great tower defence game with a quirky enough premise to standout amongst its peers. It’s certainly more fun to play with others than tackle the invaders alone but if you are able to bring together a group you can easily while away the hours avenging the earth.

Thanks to Xbox and Clapfoot for their support

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Dungeon of the Endless preview

Dungeon of the Endless brings together mechanics from RPGs, tower defence and survival games and ties them together with a Rogue-like knot. The result is a wonderfully compelling and a splendidly unique experience, one that’s made all the more appealing by its multiplayer component which allows up to four players to join in on the fun. It is, however, lousy with bugs, but with full release a good month away, hopefully the worst of them can be ironed out.

With this preview build we struggled through the bugs as they snatched victory away from us at the most heart-breaking moments and frequently threw up obstacles to impede our progress. We kept at it, though, never letting the bugs win, and a large part of why we kept playing was just how much fun we were having despite the setbacks.

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Having crash-landed on an alien planet and penetrating deep into a not-so-natural network of caves, you take control of a pair of survivors and must uncover the procedurally generated dungeon made up of rooms filled with mysterious architecture and technology, find the exit, grab your escape pod’s crystal and climb to the surface 12 floors up. But of course it’s not as easy as that, as each floor is also full of monsters. These beasts are discovered randomly as you unlock each door to each new section of the dungeon, and also have a chance to spawn in any discovered but unpowered rooms. In order to limit the monster spawns and protect your party of survivors and the escape pod’s crystal, you need to use your resources to power rooms and then build defences, support modules, and resource generating nodes in them.

On top of that you can also find items to equip that increase your attack power, defence, speed and wit, whilst also levelling up your survivors at the cost of resources. Other survivors can also be found within the dungeon, allowing you to recruit and switch out new members in your party, with each character sporting their own set of stats that make them more effective at certain things. Furthermore the nodes and modules you can build can be upgraded by finding a mysterious research crystal. Meanwhile, in singleplayer each character has their own personal story that’s gradually revealed between floors.

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It’s a complex set of mechanics that can easily overwhelm you in your initial few attempt to survive the dungeon, and whilst a tutorial is present, it’s hidden away behind in-game menus and is disappointingly text-based. However, once you do figure out how everything fits together it reveals itself to be magnificently conceived and well-balanced, as well as hugely compelling.

Different escape pods can be chosen at the start – once they’re unlocked – which modify the experience with additional challenges, and the characters offer a variety of different skills and stats to change things up, all this on top of the procedurally generated nature of the title and Dungeon of the Endless possesses oodles of longevity.

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The bugs truly are horrendous in this preview build, however. Research not completing, monsters that can’t be targeted, the level not ending once you reach the exit with the crystal, freezing on the transition screen between floors, and several more bugs hindered our progress over and over again. It remained fun but became frustrating, but as long as these bugs are quelled for release, then I’m certain when we come to review Dungeon of the Endless, the praise will be astronomical.

Kaiju Panic review

Kaiju Panic

Kaiju Panic, from indie team Mechabit, is a real-time tower defence game. Following the impact of a series of meteorites across the world, strange never-before seen Kaiju have begun amassing near the impact sites. These meteors are also having a mutagenic effect on the Kaiju, transforming them into more powerful and devastating foes.

You are the commander of an international response team charged with rescuing as many civilians as possible while both staving off the marauding Kaiju as well as recovering their constituent parts to aid in further research in order to defeat them.

In order to stave off the onslaught, you have command of an orbiting distribution platform that can drop defensive structures to a location, purchased using recovered shards of the downed meteorites. These are extracted by placing processors in their direct proximity, much like the Command & Conquer refineries.

Each area has two types of mission; recover and extract. During the recovery phase you must locate and recruit members of the public while protecting your headquarters from increasing waves of enemy Kaiju, and with over 40 different enemies, each with their own strengths and weaknesses, planning how to defend is the order of the day. To achieve this, you are given advance notice of the direction and type of Kaiju attacking. Extraction missions are the final big showdown for each district, with a shuttle on a set timer inbound to rescue all the civilians you have managed to save and will typically feature a Super Kaiju such as Chibizilla.

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Much like many mobile games, each round has a scoring system linked to additional challenges that can be accomplished during a round, such as protecting all high value buildings in the area, collecting ceremonial masks, or even activating pentagrams in the correct order. Accomplishing these also typically rewards you with additional meteorite shards, so it benefits to attempt these supplemental requirements.

The story, such that it is, is conveyed using storyboards and traces of the humour Mechabit have infused into the game bleed through into these sections. This is further exemplified when in the Kaiju Lab, where you can read the humorous and informative analysis on the Kaiju you have encountered, along with the profiles of the 180 plus civilians you will encounter throughout the game.

The Lab also serves to provide you with research capabilities, allowing upgrades and purchases for the defenses you can build under the Cannon, Acid, Laser, Explosive and Utility tech trees contained within, encompassing the 19 different orbital drops at your disposal. It also houses your Commander skills, that convey a range of perks and buffs to make the battle that much easier such as the increased building health, unit health, shard pick up range and even an orbital strike that can do mass amounts of damage to the invading beasts. All of these are purchasable using the research points that drop from defeated Kaiju.

Graphically, Kaiju Panic is very simple and characters appear one part playmobile, one part cannon fodder to create a very unique style. These characters serve further function and provide additional depth to the game. As you collect the civilians in the area, they follow you around and approaching constructions will have them aid in its manufacture speeding up the development time. They will also repair any damaged structures in the environment, excluding the HQ itself, but their main function lies with the defensive structures. approaching these allows you to staff the weapons with civilians, each of whom have their own particular buffs and advantages; some give greater range to the weapons, some repair it from within, and some even convey specific damage types such as fire or acid to the weapon. Balancing the need for increased damage output and range with the ability to quickly throw up more structures is a further critical mechanic you have to keep in mind as you progress further into the game.

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One of the key frustrations I found, was when encountering new Kaiju. Some are vulnerable only to specific weapons, and until you have killed one to obtain research on them, it is impossible to predict what will and won’t work. With that in mind, you can find yourself out of resource and with the wrong defensive strategy for several fights as you try to work out which attack method will work, and as the range of structures available increases level upon level, this does mean there is an increased likelihood that you will apply the wrong tactic.

This can become quite frustrating, especially when you clear all but the last wave of enemies, only to be overrun and destroyed at the 11th hour.

Kaiju Panic is an extremely well polished, amazing and above all fun game, that straddles the boundary between a pick up and play game style and more in-depth strategy management. Those looking for something a little different, or have a hankering for a decent strategy game will be able to take a lot away from this title.

Thanks to Xbox and Mechabit for supporting TiX

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